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    12 Small Updates With Big Impact in a Bathroom

    Leveling up your bathroom might sound like a huge undertaking, but the truth is, giving this space a new look you love doesn’t have to mean a major reno — or maybe even any reno work at all. (And how nice would it be to get ready every morning with better lighting or an uncluttered countertop?)The key is to focus on little switch-ups that make a surprisingly big difference and to rely on a solid all-in-one source, like The Home Depot, where you can find all the elements you need to pull it off: vanities, cabinets, lighting, hardware, accessories, and more. Still not sure you’re ready for a revamp? These 12 easy ideas will inspire you to spruce up your space.Go for the BoldYour vanity is the visual focal point of any bathroom (and key to your grooming and storage needs), so it deserves to be a truly standout piece. Consider a sleek floating version for a modern, boutique-hotel look, or choose one with a brightly colored finish as an unexpected statement piece in the room.Get ReflectiveHere’s a no-fail way to add instant sparkle to your space: Trade out your tired medicine cabinet for a pair of clean-lined mirrors above your vanity. (The supplies you stored there can find a new home in the cabinet below, in stackable organizers to max out that space.) Keep the room’s look cohesive by opting for mirrors with frames in the same finish as your lighting fixtures and hardware.Brighten Things UpSconces on either side of your medicine cabinet or mirror will illuminate your vanity and mirror area evenly — no unflattering overhead shadows! — and give the bathroom an updated look too. If you want to avoid electrical wiring, go with plug-in versions.Refresh Your WallsWant the chic look of tile but not the tricky DIY work that goes with it? Bring in peel-and-stick wallpaper that looks just like tile but takes a lot less time and effort to install. Bonus: It’s a simple element to switch out later if you decide you want to change things up.Get the look! Perfect picks for a wow-worthy bathroom.

    Sandon Vanity

    Home Decorators Collection
    homedepot.com

    $2,199.00

    Modern Mirror

    Home Decorators Collection
    homedepot.com

    $129.00

    Carisa Gold Bath Light

    Progress Lighting
    homedepot.com

    $60.00

    Peel and Stick Chrome Tile Wallpaper

    Tempaper
    homedepot.com

    $34.60 More

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    10 Insider Bathroom Remodeling Tips for DIYers

    Remodeling a bathroom is one of the most satisfying home improvement tasks because of its multi-pronged payoff: It’s your chance to combine all the practical features you need with a personalized style you love — and create a relaxing retreat in the process.If you’re taking on this project yourself (or even a part of it, like installing tile), it’s helpful to have a go-to source for practical guidance — and with its DIY project guides, how-to workshops, and project calculators to help you figure out how much material to order, The Home Depot is a smart bet. And when you’re ready to get started, you can shop for everything from tubs and vanities to showers, tiles, and finishing touches, all from the same spot. (You can even More

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    10 Cleaning Tasks You Can Totally Tackle in 5 Minutes

    1. Fill your dishwasher with everything but dishes.Plastic toys, soap dishes, plastic hairbrushes and more can get clean in dishwasher — zero effort required. Take a lap around your house and gather the stuff you rarely (err, never?) clean and run an everything-but-plates load.2. Sprinkle and suck up.Toss a bit of baking soda onto carpeting, upholstered furniture, and even your mattress, and let the stuff work its de-stinking magic for 15 minutes. Then, vacuum it away for an instantly fresher space.3. Walk around with a lint roller.This portable, versatile closet staple is a master at lifting dirt, crumbs, and dust from all of those spots you’ve let languish. Run it over a lampshade, the bottom of your purse, stuffed animals, and other hard-to-reach spots to spiff them up.

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    4. Pick up pet hair quickly.A pair of damp rubber dish gloves is all you need to finally get Fido’s fur off your favorite pillow or armchair.5. Banish dust from baseboards.You can tackle dingy spots without stooping. Lightly spray an old sock with some cleaning solution and run your foot over the baseboards to whisk debris away in a flash.6. Give your gadgets some attention.Your cell phone probably harbors more germs than your toilet seat (um, ick), and you probably never clean it. Run an alcohol wipe over the surface of your often-handled electronics (that includes your TV remote). 7. Wipe down your purse.It’s kind of remarkable how some things we touch daily are the ones we rarely clean — your purse is another one of those spots. About half all women’s bags have fecal bacteria on them, so give it a swipe with a disinfectant wipe.

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    8. Freshen your garbage disposal.Got kitchen stink you just can’t kick? Try running a couple of lemon rinds through your garbage disposal, and follow with cold water to dispel the smell. 9. Clear dust from ceiling fans.Before the first hot day makes you flip your fan’s switch, make sure it won’t fling dust all over the room. An old pillow case makes quick and tidy work of making your fan blades sparkle again.10. For goodness sake, just toss that pile of catalogs.There are certain things you just don’t need to think about before you get rid of them. Recycle that stack cluttering your nightstand, no questions asked, and feel the lightness of free space in seconds.

    Lauren Piro
    Senior Web Editor
    Overseeing all things home for GoodHousekeeping.com and HouseBeautiful.com, Lauren swoons over midcentury design and employs tough-love approach to decluttering (just throw it away, ladies).

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    9 Real-Life Ways to Banish Paper Clutter

    Ah, paper. They keeping telling us that tablet computers, high-tech wristwatches, and all other things digital will soon replace the need for Post-its and flyers — and yet, every available surface in your home is littered with mail, catalogs, forms, and more. Here’s how to keep the paper monster at bay.1. Admit that the paper isn’t the problem. It’s you.”Paper comes into our homes two ways — either we print it or we carry it in,” says Maeve Richmond, founder and organizing coach at Maeve’s Method. “There’s no paper fairy that dumps clutter onto our desks at night. To begin reducing the volume, be more conscious about the paper you bring inside.” 2. To do this, adopt a paper-banishing alter ego.”Conjure your inner super villain, and be heartless about keeping paper out of your space,” says professional organizer Seana Turner. “Visualize paper as a culprit that steals your real estate, and then only keep to what you desperately need.” Ask yourself if you really need another pamphlet from your doctor’s office or another school flyer — especially when all of the information is probably available online. 3. Create opportunities to toss paper, not keep it around.”Use the time walking from your mailbox to sort out junk mail, and toss it before you even get inside,” says professional organizer Rachel Rosenthal. Place a recycling bin (or better yet, a shredder) in your mudroom or garage, or at least not very far from your front door. Then you’ll be left with stuff you actually want to read (magazines, catalogs), and items that require action (bills, invitations), instead of piles of paper that still need sorting. 4. Devote one spot (just one!) to paper clutter.Chances are you can’t eliminate all paper from your home, but you can limit its reach. “Create a dedicated drop zone, like a bowl or a tray.” says Richmond. Give yourself permission to drop papers there (and only there!), and sort them after you’ve had a chance to settle in at the end of a long day. 5. Realize that mail stops being mail when you bring it inside.”Clients often ask me, ‘Where’s the best place to keep mail?'” writes professional organizer Matt Baier. “That’s like asking ‘Where’s the best place to keep groceries?'” Just like you’d immediately store milk in the fridge and canned tomatoes in the pantry, recognize that the different kinds of mail shouldn’t all just languish on your dining table. They deserve a home that makes sense (new magazines might go on your nightstand, and bills filed in a “to do” folder), and tidiness will follow.6. Replace lots of pieces of paper with one big one.”Hang a large monthly calendar,” says professional organizer Lauren Silverman. “Every appointment, party, school event, or sports practice gets recorded on the calendar as soon as the paper comes through the door, and the invitation or flyer gets tossed. By keeping track of stuff in one visible, accessible sport, you’re less likely to misplace something important, which is a reason people tend to hang onto paper in the first place.” 7. Park pretty objects where you would ordinarily pile paper.Make it difficult for paper to clutter places it doesn’t belong. “Empty surfaces act like paper magnets, so fill them with framed photos, houseplants, or other decorative pieces when you can,” says Richmond. “Choose something that anchors the spot and makes you smile.”8. Stop paying for guilt.”Many people are over-subscribed to magazines and newspapers, resulting in a pileup,” says Turner. “We look at the pile and feel guilty that we haven’t read them, which keeps us from recycling them. Limit yourself to two or three subscriptions, and if a new issue arrives before you’ve read the old one, let it go.” 9. Fight fear with technology.”People are really afraid of losing something or not being able to retrieve it later,” says professional organizer Marcia Bennett. “The truth is that 80% of the papers we file, we never use again.” If that stat doesn’t help you part with old bank statements or greeting cards, embrace the digital revolution (instead of the filing cabinet) to hold onto things. “Take documents and other papers worth saving to Staples or a copy center and have them digitally scanned,” says Richmond. “With rare exceptions, printing out a scanned copy of paperwork is just as good as the original.”Drowning under a deluge of kids’ artwork you just can’t bare to toss? “Photograph or scan the little masterpieces and turn them into photo books,” says Silverman. “This way, an extra copy can even be shared with Grandma and Grandpa.”

    Lauren Piro
    Senior Web Editor
    Overseeing all things home for GoodHousekeeping.com and HouseBeautiful.com, Lauren swoons over midcentury design and employs tough-love approach to decluttering (just throw it away, ladies).

    This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io More

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    Organizing Recipes: Best Strategies for Managing Clippings, Cards and Printouts

    Sharing recipes is so easy now with the internet. If we need any kind of recipe at all, we just Google it. We also read magazines like Good Housekeeping and clip the ones that sound great to try. Unfortunately none of that fits into the little 3×5″ card files we might still be trying to manage. Using a recipe binder is a strategy that is easy, sturdy and flexible for all sizes and types of recipes. Choose a binder that is very sturdy with reinforced edges and room to grow; at least 2″ width is best for most recipe collections. Buy one with pockets on the inside covers and ideally a clear sleeve on the spine and front to creatively label your collection.Use a combination of full-page sheet protectors and 3-ring photo sleeves (3×5″ or 4×6″ or a combination) to hold the recipes inside the binder. Using sleeves like these enables quick inserting of new recipes without needing to punch holes, and it also protects the pages from splatters while you are cooking.Purchase tabbed dividers that are extra wide, so that the tabs extend beyond the edges of the sheet protectors. (Avery #11222 is an example of these.) You may need to buy two packages of dividers depending upon the number of categories you have.Choose from these recommended headings, or create your own: Appetizers & Beverages, Breads & Breakfasts, Cakes/Pies/Desserts, Candy/Cookies, Main Dishes, Salads/Side Dishes, Sauces/Spices, Soups, Take Out Menus.When you clip or print a new recipe, tuck it into the front inside cover pocket and keep it there until you try the recipe with your own family. Once it is declared a keeper, file it away in your sheet protectors in the right category. If there are so many new ones that it’s overwhelming to have them in the pocket together, try an accordion folder with the same category slots as a temporary home for the “untried and untrue” clippings.

    3-Ring Recipe Binder

    Jot & Mark
    amazon.com

    $34.99

    The back inside cover pocket can store small manuals and instructions that you reference often, such as the instructions for sharpening your knives or the timing chart for your steamer or rice cooker. Share your recipe collection thoughts in the comments!

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    Take a Tour of Victoria's Secret Model Sanne Vloet's Perfectly Organized Kitchen

    Victoria’s Secret model and founder of the matcha company, Nekohama, Sanne Vloet recently redecorated her kitchen. Her space is modernly designed and bright — items beautifully (and expertly) placed and stored in her cabinets and drawers. Keeping your kitchen organized isn’t an easy feat. It can be daunting, especially when you’re shopping weekly or bi-weekly and your utensils and pantry items increase and overflow. Lucky for us, Sanne welcomed Good Housekeeping into her home, giving us a tour of her brand new kitchen and how she keeps it clutter-free. During the walkthrough, you’ll be impressed by the size of Sanne’s kitchen. It’s so spacious! Most of her ceramic kitchenware (she loves buying them for cooking videos and at-home group dinners) are neatly stored in drawers featuring built-in organizers. She uses trays on the counter to place her most-used items (including having her bamboo tea tray next to the coffee machine for her matcha) and keeps her spices together in labeled glass jars so they’re easy to find. Along with showing us her pantry — where she uses baskets labeled Breakfast, Snacks and Cans — Sanne gave us a look into one of the most challenging spaces for her to keep tidy: the laundry closet. For those seeking advice, Sanne recommends using wire baskets and labeling everything — from your tape and umbrellas to your tote bags and detergent. Tip we love: Sanne keeps her pots, pans, plates and bowls in her kitchen island’s drawers. She also uses drawer liners to keep them from slipping.
    Organize Your Kitchen Like Sanne

    Bamboo Expandable Drawer Organizer

    Pipishell
    amazon.com

    $25.99

    $22.09 (15% off)

    ZRAZ Kitchen Wire Baskets

    ZRAZ
    amazon.com

    $17.99

    Natural Bamboo Vanity Tray

    Qttify
    amazon.com

    $14.99

    Talented Kitchen 24 Glass Spice Jars & Labels

    Talented Kitchen
    amazon.com

    $37.50

    Mariah Thomas
    Mariah Thomas is the Assistant Editor for Good Housekeeping, where her coverage includes decorating ideas, gift guides, and DIY projects.

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    How to Make Easy Paper Snowflakes

    We’re always looking for DIY crafts to share during this cheerful season. From showing you how to make a bow as a present or decoration to how to DIY a Christmas stocking to hide your small (and delicious) treats. This time, you can learn how to make a snowflake in two different ways. Paper snowflakes make great craft ideas for kids (and unique home decorations if you’re looking for a wintery feel). You can glue them to your windows, hang them on your walls and even turn them into a snowflake wreath for all of your guests to admire. Follow our simple steps for instructions on how to make regular and 3D paper snowflakes. You can also watch our video above for step-by-step visuals. How to Make a Classic Paper SnowflakeMaterials:

    Instructions:Get to folding: Fold your paper diagonally.

    Snip snip: Cut off the excess paper at the bottom.

    Fold your paper in half.

    Fold the paper in thirds.

    Flatten out the top of your paper by cutting off points.

    Get creative: Draw your own pattern for your snowflake.

    Mark all of the empty spaces you didn’t draw on with an x.

    Reveal your pattern: Cut out the marked sections and unfold to reveal your snowflake.

    Tip: Use a low setting to lightly iron your paper snowflakes to smooth out any creases. How to Make 3D Paper Snowflakes

    Materials:Instructions:Fold your paper diagonally.Cut off the excess paper at the bottom.Fold the paper in half.Cut three diagonal lines along the non-folded edge of your paper.Unfold your paper after trimming.Tape your center flaps together. Flip and tape all of the flaps to the middle of your snowflake. Repeat all of the previous steps for the other 5 pieces of paper.Combine all six of the papers together at the middle point and use your stapler to hold them in place.Staple each section together using your stapler.

    Mariah Thomas
    Mariah Thomas is the Assistant Editor for Good Housekeeping, where her coverage includes decorating ideas, gift guides, and DIY projects.

    This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io More