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    Eight hotel interiors characterised by eclectic designs

    From guest rooms filled with fashion designer Christian Louboutin’s personal antique collection to Ibiza’s oldest hotel where handmade masks are mounted on the walls, our latest lookbook features eight eclectic hotel interiors.

    Eclectic design brings together objects and styles from a range of sources – often mixing contemporary and vintage pieces.
    While many hotels are characterised by uniform luxury, others celebrate unlikely combinations of furniture, colours and patterns.
    Here are eight eclectic hotel interiors from around the world defined by contrasts and clashes.
    This is the latest in our lookbooks series, which provides visual inspiration from Dezeen’s archive. For more inspiration, see previous lookbooks featuring residential mezzanines, Mexican holiday homes and minimalist bathrooms.

    Photo courtesy of Kelly WearstlerDowntown LA Proper, USA, by Kelly Wearstler
    American designer Kelly Wearstler has created the interiors for all four of the Proper Hotel Group’s branches across North America.
    The Downtown LA Proper is anchored by “bold and eclectic choices”, including a chunky graphite reception desk and a hand-painted archway flanked by leaning column-like cacti in rustic pots.
    Find out more about Downtown LA Proper ›
    Photo by Karel BalasMontesol Experimental, Ibiza, by Dorothée Meilichzon
    Dorothée Meilichzon of French interior design studio Chzon renovated Montesol – the oldest hotel in Ibiza, originally built in the 1930s.
    Meilichzon transformed the renamed Montesol Experimental with “a bohemian overtone” that draws on the hotel’s rich history. Among its interior elements are lumpy Playdough Stools by artist Diego Faivre, hand-crafted masks and an abundance of tassels.
    Find out more about Montesol Experimental ›
    Photo by Ambroise TézenasVermelho, Portugal, by Christian Louboutin and Madalena Caiado
    Louboutin filled his first hospitality project with furniture and materials from his personal antique collection.
    The fashion designer worked with architect Madalena Caiado to create the Vermelho boutique hotel in the Portuguese village of Melides. The guest rooms feature unexpected elements such as a rattan monkey-shaped side table and striking hand-painted frescoes.
    Find out more about Vermelho ›
    Photo by Brooke ShanesyPalm Heights, Grand Cayman, by Gabriella Khalil
    Collectible design pieces characterise Palm Heights in Grand Cayman, the island’s first boutique hotel.
    Creative director Gabriella Khalil sought to style the project like a 1970s Caribbean mansion, selecting sandy yellows and bold blue hues to complement the many original artworks that adorn the walls.
    Find out more about Palm Heights ›
    Photo by The IngallsAustin Proper Hotel and Residences, USA, by Kelly Wearstler
    Among the Proper Hotel Group’s other locations is an Austin branch. Wearstler inserted a sculptural oak staircase into the lobby that doubles as a plinth for a varied collection of glazed earthenware pots and vases.
    Locally sourced art and textiles characterise the hotel, which has cypress wood walls that were charred using the traditional Japanese technique of Shou Sugi Ban to create a tiger-striped effect.
    Find out more about Austin Proper Hotel ›
    Photo by Simon BrownHôtel de la Boétie, France, by Beata Heuman
    Swedish designer Beata Heuman created the Hôtel de la Boétie in Paris to be “a bit like a stage set”.
    Heuman chose contrasting elements for the colour-drenched interiors. Bedrooms feature a mixture of dark-hued woven headboards and pale pink sheets, while downstairs, the reception area’s jumbo flower lamps balance the steely silver of the lounge walls.
    Find out more about Hôtel de la Boétie ›
    Photo by Felix BrueggemannChâteau Royal, Germany, by Irina Kromayer
    A series of eclectic spaces make up the Château Royal in Berlin, which references the heyday of the German capital at the turn of the 20th century.
    Interior architect Irina Kromayer designed the hotel to be “authentic” rather than retro, choosing art noveau tiles and brass and nickel hardware in a nod to the finishes commonly found in Berlin’s historic buildings.
    Find out more about Château Royal ›
    Photo by Christian HarderEsme Hotel, USA, by Jessica Schuster Design
    Plush velvet flooring, textural tassels and plants in wicker pots come together at the Esme Hotel in Miami, renovated by New York studio Jessica Schuster Design.
    The interiors draw on the “bohemian grandeur” of the hotel’s 1920s history, with decadent alcoves clad with contrasting patterns.
    Find out more about Esme Hotel ›
    This is the latest in our lookbooks series, which provides visual inspiration from Dezeen’s archive. For more inspiration, see previous lookbooks featuring residential mezzanines, Mexican holiday homes and minimalist bathrooms.

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    Ten homes where flooring enhances the connection between indoors and outdoors

    Our latest lookbook explores homes where flooring details and materials help to create the impression that a living space extends out beyond a house’s exterior walls.

    A range of different techniques can be used to create the sense of a continuous floor surface.
    The most obvious is to use the same flooring material, or one that looks very similar, for both interior and exterior spaces.
    However, this isn’t always necessary. By combining level thresholds with floor-to-ceiling glazing, it’s also possible to create that sense of continuation by simply maintaining a consistent surface.
    Here, we look at 10 examples that use one or more of these methods to create different effects, ranging from a forest home in Mexico’s Valle de Bravo to a waterside villa in Denmark.

    Many of these examples use continuous floor surfaces to connect a living room with a garden or patio, but some explore other rooms where the effect can be applied.
    This is the latest in our lookbooks series, which provides visual inspiration from Dezeen’s archive. For more inspiration, see previous lookbooks featuring chocolate-brown interiors and minimalist bathrooms.
    Photography is by LGM StudioCasa Mola, Mexico, by Estudio Atemporal
    Mexico City-based Estudio Atemporal designed this house in a densely forested area of Valle de Bravo with the aim of allowing residents to live “more organically”.
    The large-format flooring tiles inside the house give way to brickwork paving outside, but sliding glass doors with level thresholds create a clean junction that allows the two spaces to feel connected.
    Find out more about Casa Mola ›
    Photo is by Agnese SanvitoThe Saddlery, UK, by Studio Octopi
    Terrazzo flooring features both inside and outside this extension to a Georgian house in southeast London, designed by architecture office Studio Octopi.
    Sourced from British manufacturer Diespeker, this material is speckled with colours that complement the mint-green tone of the building’s metal walls.
    Find out more about The Saddlery ›
    Photo is by Nick DeardonDulwich House, UK, by Proctor & Shaw
    Kitchen and terrace become a single space divided only by levels in this extension to a home in Dulwich, London, designed by architecture studio Proctor & Shaw.
    Glass doors slide open on two sides – with one disappearing into a wall – to completely open up the building’s corner. The sliding mechanism is set into a continuous porcelain tile floor surface, resulting in a flush threshold.
    Find out more about Dulwich House ›
    Photo is by Maxime DelvauxMaison Hercourt, France, Studio Guma
    Minimal glazing plays a key role in connecting the kitchen of this renovated stone farmhouse in Normandy with an adjoining patio.
    Designed by Paris-based Studio Guma, the renovation involved installing the kitchen in a space that previously functioned as a cart shed. Although the floor surface changes from concrete to stone from inside to outside, the slender-framed glass doors help the two surfaces to be read as one.
    Find out more about Maison Hercourt ›
    Photo is by Jonas Bjerre-PoulsenFjord Boat House, Denmark, by Norm Architects
    Copenhagen-based Norm Architects chose handmade ceramic bricks for the flooring of this vacation house, built on the edge of a fjord just outside the city.
    They form stairs that lead down from the main house to a terrace, then continue inside to give the interior living spaces a casual, rustic feel. At the main entrance, the linearity of the brickwork pattern acts to draw the eye.
    Find out more about Fjord Boat House ›

    Ederlezi, Mexico, Práctica Arquitectura
    Using the same flooring surface for both indoors and outdoors can become costly, but this low-cost infill house in Monterrey offers a clever solution.
    Designed by locally based Práctica Arquitectura, the house features a stepped living space with an adjoining courtyard.
    Most of the courtyard is landscaped, but the edges are lined with the same square saltillo tiles that provide interior flooring. This helps to extend the living space outdoors without requiring quite as many tiles.
    Find out more about Ederlezi ›
    Photo is by Helen CathcartThe Maker’s Barn, UK, by Hutch Design
    Full-height glazing features in many of the rooms of this rural holiday rental on the outskirts of London, a former pig shed renovated by Hutch Design. This results in a strong connection with the surrounding patio.
    The effect is particularly effective in the primary bedroom, which features a bath set into the floor. Here, it’s possible to observe the clean line running between the end-grain timber flooring inside and the paving tiles outside.
    Find out more about The Maker’s Barn ›
    Photo is by Rory GardinerMossy Point, Australia, by Edition Office
    Melbourne-based Edition Office selected very different surfaces for the shower room of this house in Mossy Point, New South Wales, but they appear to merge thanks to the use of frameless glazing.
    A similar effect can be found throughout the house, but the contrast between the wooden decking and the blue tiles of this room is the most striking.
    Find out more about Mossy Point ›

    Shift House, Spain, by Nomo Studio
    Roughly polished white concrete flooring unites both the interior and exterior of this house on the island of Menorca, designed by Barcelona-based Nomo Studio.
    This creates a feeling of continuity from the building’s entrance, located on the uppermost storey, all the way across to a balcony terrace on the opposite side of the main living room.
    Find out more about Shift House ›
    Photo is by Brotherton LockA Modern Oasis, UK, by Richard Parr Associates
    The level thresholds of this house in Oxfordshire, England, create a visual connection between the polished concrete flooring inside and the paving tiles outside.
    Architecture office Richard Parr Associates carefully matched the colours of these two surfaces so that they appear to be made of the same material.
    Find out more about A Modern Oasis ›
    This is the latest in our lookbooks series, which provides visual inspiration from Dezeen’s archive. For more inspiration, see previous lookbooks featuring chocolate-brown interiors and minimalist bathrooms.

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    Eight home interiors where mezzanines maximise usable space

    For our latest lookbook, we’ve rounded up eight home interiors that make clever use of mezzanines to optimise floorspace.

    Mezzanines, which are used as an intermediate level between the lower floor and a ceiling, have the ability to increase gross internal floor area by capitalising on extra ceiling height.
    These raised floors offer additional room to host a variety of spaces – including bedrooms, home offices and reading spaces, to name a few.
    Ranging from compact apartment renovations to newly-built, split-level holiday homes, this diverse collection of home interiors showcases how mezzanines can be used as a creative solution to maximise floorspace and create dynamic home layouts.
    This is the latest in our lookbooks series, which provides visual inspiration from Dezeen’s archive. For more inspiration, see previous lookbooks featuring minimalist bathrooms with peaceful interiors, compact garden studios with neat storage solutions and homes lit by central courtyards.

    Photo by David DworkindHickson Residence, Canada, by Ménard Dworkind
    Located on the south shore of Montreal, this 1980s house was renovated by local studio Ménard Dworkind and features rounded plaster details and a terracotta fireplace.
    The studio added a sculptural mezzanine to the 520-square-meter home, which hosts the bedrooms, bathrooms and an office overlooking the double-height living room below.
    Find out more about Hickson Residence ›
    Photo by Seth CaplanDumbo Loft, USA, by Crystal Sinclair Designs 
    Crystal Sinclair Designs renovated this loft apartment in Brooklyn to include a mezzanine hosting a book collection, as well as a bedroom accessed via a ladder.
    The studio retained the space’s existing industrial look but complemented it by adding wooden furniture and white and grey marble.
    Find out more about Dumbo Loft ›
    Photo by José Hevia 105JON, Spain, by Vallribera Arquitectes
    This renovation of a narrow terraced house in Spain by Vallribera Arquitectes saw the studio add a mezzanine level to increase the home’s limited floor area.
    Defined by its blue-painted steel and chipwood construction, the mezzanine level offers space for two children’s bedrooms, along with a bathroom and a small study.
    Find out more about 105JON ›
    Photo by Pier CarthewKerr, Australia, by SSdH
    Housed in a former chocolate factory, Kerr is a warehouse apartment in Melbourne designed by local studio SSdH to include a split-level layout.
    A mezzanine-style level wrapped by a white steel-mesh balustrade occupies the upper floor and contains an open-plan living space and kitchen.
    Find out more about Kerr ›
    Photo by JAG StudioHorno de Pan, Ecuador, by ERDC Arquitectos
    ERDC Arquitectos and Taller General used brick and glass to construct this arched roof home in Quito that features an open mezzanine level.
    Split across three levels, the lowest level offers living and kitchen areas, while an entry, bathroom, bedrooms and studio are provided on the upper floors.
    Find out more about Horno de Pan ›
    Photo by Pierce ScourfieldFerguson, Scotland, by Duncan Blackmore, Lee Ivett and Simon Harlow
    Brightly coloured walls decorate this tiny apartment in Glasgow designed by Duncan Blackmore, Lee Ivett and Simon Harlow, which contains no freestanding furniture.
    To maximise floor and height space within the 25-square-metre home, a small mezzanine level hosts a sleeping space that is accessed via built-in wooden steps.
    Find out more about Ferguson ›
    Photo by José CamposHouse in Rua Direita de Francos, Portugal, by WeStudio and Made
    Mezzanine levels feature throughout the living and bedroom spaces within this gabled, stone house in Porto designed by We Studio and Made.
    A staircase in the kitchen space leads up to a study on a mezzanine level, while ladders in the bedrooms lead up to mezzanines situated above en-suite bathrooms or storage cupboards.
    Find out more about House in Rua Direita de Francos ›
    Photo by Rory GardinerCasa Alférez, Mexico, by Ludwig Godefroy
    Situated in a Mexican pine forest, this brutalist holiday home by Ludwig Godefroy is defined by concrete walls, built-in furniture and wooden floors.
    Composed of five half-levels organised around double-height spaces, the home’s compact arrangement was strategically designed to prioritise height over width.
    Find out more about Casa Alférez ›
    This is the latest in our lookbooks series, which provides visual inspiration from Dezeen’s archive. For more inspiration, see previous lookbooks featuring minimalist bathrooms with peaceful interiors, compact garden studios with neat storage solutions and homes lit by central courtyards.

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    Eight chocolate-brown interiors that look good enough to eat

    In memoriam of the many chocolate eggs that will be consumed this Easter, our latest lookbook rounds up eight homes with tasteful cocoa-coloured interiors.

    Chocolatey brown might be the unofficial colour of Easter as the biggest driver of chocolate sales – second only to Christmas.
    But the rich, earthy hue is also proving increasingly popular among interior designers for its unique function as both a colour and a natural, able to bring a sense of warmth to otherwise minimalist spaces.
    Below are eight mouth-watering examples to feast your eyes on, including a rammed-earth house in Brazil and the renovation of a Shigeru Ban loft conversion in New York.
    This is the latest in our lookbooks series, which provides visual inspiration from Dezeen’s archive. For more inspiration, see previous lookbooks featuring minimalist bathrooms, breakfast nooks and compact garden studios with neat storage solutions.

    Photo by Jack LovelShadow House, Australia, by Grotto Studio
    Almost all of the surfaces in this Perth cottage extension by Grotto Studio are lined in sumptuous brown timber, from the walls and floors in the bedroom to the entire bathroom counter.
    “The choice of dark timber for the interior was motivated by a desire to create a rich, intimate and immersive atmosphere,” studio founder Craig Nener told Dezeen.
    “The dark tones add depth and character to the spaces, creating a warm and inviting ambience.”
    Find out more about Shadow House ›
    Photo by Syam SreesylamChuzhi house, India, by Wallmakers
    Soil, waste and debris were used to form the spiralling walls of Chuzhi house in Shoolagiri, India, giving the interiors a rustic, earthy feeling.
    To keep the focus on the architecture, the rooms themselves are finished in matching colours with reclaimed timber floors complemented by woven and wooden furniture.
    Find out more about Chuzhi house ›
    Photo by Fabian MartinezColonia Condesa house, Mexico, by Chloé Mason Gray
    Interior designer Chloé Mason Gray sought to embrace the lack of natural light in this bachelor pad in Mexico City’s Condesa neighbourhood, shaded by large trees from the avenue outside.
    Embracing the dark and moody atmosphere, the designer chose colours and textures that would make the spaces feel “masculine, rich, and interesting” including leather, linen and textured chocolate-brown plaster.
    Find out more about Colonia Condesa house ›
    Photo by Felix SpellerMayfair pied-à-terre, UK, by Child Studio
    Adolf Loos’s modernist Villa Muller informed the dining area in this London mews house, where mahogany joinery is backed by veiny dark red marble.
    Soft light filters into the space from a glass-brick partition, blocking out the kitchen and rounding off the intimate atmosphere created by Child Studio.
    Find out more about this Mayfair pied-à-terre ›
    Photo by Gareth HackerHighbury House, UK, by Daytrip
    A more pared-back take on the theme comes in the form of this vintage 1970s Gilda sofa by Michel Ducaroy, composed of multiple segments reminiscent of a Chocolate Orange.
    It serves as a focal point in the otherwise muted living room of London’s Highbury House, paired with a blackened oak armchair by EBBA Architects founder Benni Allan and one of David Horan’s delicate Paper lights.
    Find out more about Highbury House ›
    Photo by Federico CairoliCasa em Cunha, Brazil, by Arquipélago Arquitetos
    The rammed-earth construction of this house in Brazil’s mountainous Cunha region is left exposed on the interior, creating an organic striped finish across the walls.
    Matching brown finishes feature heavily throughout the rest of the home, where ceilings are covered in wooden slats while the bathroom is defined by coppery hardware and tiles the colour of bitter chocolate.
    Find out more about Casa em Cunha ›
    Photo by César Béjar StudioCasa Los Tigres, Mexico, by César Béjar Studio and Fernando Sánchez Zepeda
    Dark wood panelling helps to hide doors and storage inside the Casa Los Tigres beach house on Mexico’s Pacific Coast, designed by César Béjar Studio and Fernando Sánchez Zepeda.
    It encircles the lower portion of the living spaces and develops the bedrooms almost entirely, paired with pale stone flooring and pared-back accessories to create a calm refuge.
    Find out more about Casa Los Tigres ›
    Photo by David MitchellTribeca loft renovation, USA, by Timothy Godbold
    New York interior designer Timothy Godbold was responsible for renovating this loft in a historic Tribeca textile factory, originally converted by Pritzker Architecture Prize-winning Japanese architect Shigeru Ban in 2019.
    The former TV room now functions as a home office and bar, with a low-slung chestnut-brown sofa helping to warm up the otherwise neutral colour palette while wall reliefs informed by 1970s sci-fi spice up the walls.
    Find out more about this Tribeca loft renovation ›
    This is the latest in our lookbooks series, which provides visual inspiration from Dezeen’s archive. For more inspiration, see previous lookbooks featuring minimalist bathrooms, breakfast nooks and compact garden studios with neat storage solutions.

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    Eight minimalist bathrooms with peaceful pared-back interiors

    For our latest lookbook, we have collected eight minimalist bathrooms that combine tactile materials and organic details to create a relaxing and tranquil environment.

    Next to the bedroom, the bathroom is often the place in the home that is reserved for relaxation and pampering. Keeping interiors here free of unnecessary clutter while adding organic materials such as wood and stone can help to create a tranquil feel.
    Below, we’ve showcased minimalist bathrooms in eight homes from around the world from Mexico to Belgium that show creative and beautiful solutions for this important room.
    This is the latest in our lookbooks series, which provides visual inspiration from Dezeen’s archive. For more inspiration, see previous lookbooks featuring Mexican holiday homes, interiors with dramatic full-length curtains and living spaces with swings.
    Photo by by Jonas Bjerre-PoulsenHeatherhill Beach House, Denmark, by Norm Architects

    This beach house on the Danish coast was created as “a getaway from everyday life in Copenhagen”, according to its designers Norm Architects.
    The home’s two minimalist bathrooms were informed by Japanese traditions and feature simple wooden details and brick floors.
    “The spaces are rather small and should still feel comfortable and spacious,” architect Sophie Bak told Dezeen.
    Find out more about Heatherhill Beach House ›
    Photo by Radek ÚlehlaSculptor’s Apartment, Czech Republic, by Neuhäusl Hunal
    Translucent glass panels were used throughout this apartment in Prague, designed by Czech architecture studio Neuhäusl Hunal as a workspace for a sculptor.
    A centralised, curved bathroom features a walk-in shower that is raised on a small platform and clad in white ceramic tiles.
    Find out more about Sculptor’s Apartment ›
    Photo by Givlio AristideCloister House, Australia, by MORQ
    Architecture studio MORQ designed this rammed-concrete house in Perth, Australia, to surround a plant-filled courtyard.
    The interiors also feature visible rammed concrete combined with red hardwood ceilings. In the bathroom, these materials create textural interest and are contrasted with steel fixtures and a wooden floor.
    Find out more about Cloister House ›
    Photo by Mariell Lind HansenCanyon House, UK, by Studio Hagen Hall
    The minimalist bathroom in Canyon House was given a warm feel through the use of cork tiles, which clad both the floor and the bathtub.
    Like the rest of the house, the interior was informed by 1970s California modernism. Pale lavender-coloured curtains and globe-shaped bathroom lamps add simple decorative touches to the space.
    Find out more about Canyon House ›
    Photo by Fabián MartinezLoma Residence, Mexico, by Esrawe Studio
    Local firm Esrawe Studio wrapped the whole interior of this Mexico City apartment in an oak “skin” – save for the stone-clad bathroom.
    Here, the all-stone walls and floor create a striking interior with their natural patterns, while an oval washbasin and built-in shower add interesting geometries.
    Find out more about Loma Residence ›
    Photo by Salva LópezCasolare Scarani, Italy, by Studio Andrew Trotter
    This 19th-century school in Puglia, Italy, was turned into a home by architecture practice Studio Andrew Trotter, which aimed to “bring it back to life without destroying its essence”.
    In the bathroom, the studio kept the traditional stone flooring and added calming lime-plaster walls. Geometric glass lamps, a jute rug and a copper tap and soap holder give the minimalist bathroom a rustic touch.
    Find out more about Casolare Scarani ›
    Photo by Tim Van de VeldeKarper, Belgium, by Hé!
    Clay plaster clads the walls of the bathroom in this Brussels home (above and main image) designed by Belgian studio Hé! While the colour palette was kept simple – held mostly in pale beige and white – plenty of green plants give the space life.
    The apartment is located in a former industrial building on Karperstraat, to which the studio added a timber-framed rooftop extension.
    Find out more about Karper ›
    Photo by Lorenzo ZandriNelson Terrace, UK, by Paolo Cossu Architects
    This minimalist apartment in London, which local studio Paolo Cossu Architects designed “almost like a blank canvas”, features an equally minimalist bathroom.
    Here, a chunky white bathtub sits next to a geometric steel stool – a decorative piece that functions almost like an artwork in the pared-back space. A fabric shower curtain and wooded towel rack give the room a more organic feel.
    Find out more about Nelson Terrace ›
    This is the latest in our lookbooks series, which provides visual inspiration from Dezeen’s archive. For more inspiration, see previous lookbooks featuring Mexican holiday homes, interiors with dramatic full-length curtains and living spaces with swings.

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    Eight compact garden studios with neat storage solutions

    From cantilevered shelves to customisable pegboards, our latest lookbook rounds up eight examples of garden studios with storage designed to make the most of limited space.

    Garden studios are becoming increasingly popular in homes around the world, prompted largely by the evergrowing trend of remote work.
    Often slotted into small spaces, these structures typically have compact footprints and require efficient storage solutions to keep them clutter-free.
    The examples in this lookbook demonstrate some of the ways storage can be suitably integrated within a garden studio, helping save valuable space within their small footprints.
    This is the latest in our lookbooks series, which provides visual inspiration from Dezeen’s archive. For more inspiration, see previous lookbooks featuring Mexican holiday homes, full-length curtains and living spaces with swings.

    Photo by Wai Ming NgCork Study, UK, by Surman Weston
    Birch shelves and twin desks cantilever from the walls of Cork Study, which Surman Weston created in the narrow garden of a home in north London.
    The set-up was designed to help maximise space within the compact studio, which measures just 13 square metres and was created as a workspace for a musician and a seamstress.
    The two desks, complete with their own cubby holes, are broken by a long vertical window in the rear wall, illuminating the workspaces with natural light.
    Find out more about Cork Study ›
    Photo by Nancy ZhouNightlight, New Zealand, by Fabric
    Green storage boxes on wheels slot neatly below the workbench of this outbuilding in New Zealand, which occupies the future garden of a home being developed on the site.
    There are also slender slats mounted to the wooden framework of the 10-square-metre structure, forming minimalist shelves from which tools can be hung.
    Find out more about Nightlight ›
    Photo by Ashlea WesselThe Garden Studio, Canada, by Six Four Five A
    The founder of architecture studio Six Four Five A built storage into the wooden shell of his tiny studio, which he created in the garden of his Toronto home.
    Exposed vertical studs double as supports for shelves and a large standing desk made from birch plywood along one side, preventing cluttering up the 9.3-square-metre space.
    Find out more about The Garden Studio ›
    Photo by Jonas AdolfsenWriter’s Cottage, Norway, by Jarmund/Vigsnæs Architects
    This cabin-like studio sits at the end of a garden in Oslo, where it acts as a compact and secluded workspace for the owner who is a writer.
    Among its storage solutions is a plywood staircase that incorporates a shelving system beneath it, leading up to a mezzanine sleeping area that tucks beneath its pitched roof.
    Find out more about Writer’s Cottage ›
    Photo by Wai Ming NgWriter’s Shed, UK, by Surman Weston
    Another project by Surman Weston on the list is the Writer’s Shed, a shingle-clad garden studio designed as a writing retreat for an author.
    Inside, a cluster of shelves has been built around the chimney of the wood-burning stove, which is used to heat the compact structure. While providing valuable storage space, they are also intended as “a centrepiece for the client to store his library of books”, Surman Weston said.
    Find out more about Writer’s Shed ›
    Photo by Sarah BurtonTerrazzo Studio, UK, by Sonn
    In east London, architect Tim Robinson designed and built himself a little studio and workshop at the end of his garden.
    The narrow workshop contains a line of storage units raised above the floor, alongside a large pegboard for storing tools. Next door in the studio space, a rear wall of cabinets incorporates a concealed fold-down bed, enabling the space to become a guest bedroom.
    Find out more about Terrazzo Studio ›
    Photo courtesy of Boano PrišmontasMy Room in the Garden, UK, by Boano Prišmontas
    This modular pod is a prototype for a garden studio, developed by London studio Boano Prišmontas in response to an increase in people working from home prompted by the Covid-19 pandemic.
    Inside, the plywood structure can be fitted out with customisable elements including pegboards from which desks, shelves and storage can be hung.
    “My Room in the Garden was created with comfort and customisability in mind,” said the studio. “We wanted to allow people to be able to decide what their interior would look like or how much storage they would have, and we do that by creating a system of interchangeable elements.”
    Find out more about My Room in the Garden ›
    Photo by Shannon McGrathWriter’s Shed, Australia, by Matt Gibson
    This deceptively spacious garden studio that architect Matt Gibson created in Melbourne is hidden behind ivy-covered walls.
    An angular desk slots into one corner, with one side nestled below two generous high-level shelving units on the walls. Plywood was used across all of the surfaces, giving the interior a unified look that adds to the sense of spaciousness.
    Find out more about Writer’s Shed ›
    This is the latest in our lookbooks series, which provides visual inspiration from Dezeen’s archive. For more inspiration, see previous lookbooks featuring Mexican holiday homes, full-length curtains and living spaces with swings.

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    Ten Mexican holiday homes characterised by earthy hues

    From a brutalist dwelling nestled in a pine forest to a beachy weekend retreat with a rooftop swimming pool, our latest lookbook features 10 holiday homes across Mexico.

    While known for their often vibrant colours, Mexican interiors also include many examples of more muted designs. These earthy hues are often created through the use of natural and local materials, such as wood and stone.
    Holiday homes are located all over the country, which has a varied landscape and is famous for its escapist destinations. Here are 10 Mexican holiday homes that combine pared-back colour palettes with getaway-style luxury.
    This is the latest in our lookbooks series, which provides visual inspiration from Dezeen’s archive. For more inspiration, see previous lookbooks featuring metal furniture, breakfast nooks and living spaces with swings.
    Top and above: photos by Rory GardinerCasa Alférez, Alférez, by Ludwig Godefroy

    This holiday home is a brutalist dwelling clad in board-formed concrete and located in a pine forest in the country’s Alférez region.
    French architect Ludwig Godefroy, who is Mexico City-based, added a conversation pit to the cathedral-like living area, which features a spindly double-height fireplace.
    Find out more about Casa Alférez ›
    Photo by LGM StudioHoliday home, San Simón El Alto, by Estudio Atemporal
    Local architecture office Estudio Atemporal designed a weekend retreat in San Simón El Alto village with an oversized gabled roof.
    Inside, the studio created a statement brick wall in the angular, open-plan living space defined by timber and concrete accents. Generous glass doors lead to a covered outdoor patio.
    Find out more about this holiday home ›
    Photo by César BéjarVilla Cava, Tulum, by Espacio 18 Arquitectura
    Neutral tones and textures define this house in Tulum that was informed by cenotes – ancient sunken water-filled limestone pits and caves found across Mexico’s Yucatán Peninsula.
    Espacio 18 Arquitectura carved a circular window into one of the home’s ceilings, which reveals a rooftop swimming pool. Blue-coloured light filters through the opening, emphasising the cavernous atmosphere.
    Find out more about Villa Cava ›
    Photo by Diego Padilla MagallanesLa Extraviada, Mazunte, by Em-Estudio
    Architecture firm Em-Estudio stepped a pair of concrete residential volumes down a rocky hillside overlooking the coastal town of Mazunte, Oaxaca.
    Called La Extraviada, the holiday home includes an eclectic kitchen and dining space flanked by floor-to-ceiling timber shutters that open onto a terrace with a swimming pool.
    Regional materials, including guapinol wood and local stone obtained from nearby quarries, feature throughout the earthy-hued project.
    Find out more about La Extraviada ›
    Photo by Fabian MartinezCasa Tres Árboles, Valle de Bravo, by Direccion
    Architecture studio Direccion took cues from “monastic” sanctuaries when renovating this weekend retreat in Valle de Bravo.
    The open-plan living space includes exposed warm-toned wooden ceiling beams, which contrast against dark-painted walls. A soft-red sofa adds a rare pop of colour to the otherwise muted interiors.
    Find out more about Casa Tres Árboles ›
    Photo by Rory GardinerLos Terrenos, Monterrey, by Tatiana Bilbao
    Mexican architect Tatiana Bilbao added a multifunctional ceramic screen to the interior of Los Terrenos – a holiday home in Monterrey with mirrored glass facades that reflect the surrounding wooded site.
    “[The screen] works as solid and permeable floor, a screen partition, a structural wall, and as a semi-open wall that allows ventilation and sunlight to bathe the interior spaces,” explained Bilbao’s eponymous studio.
    Find out more about Los Terrenos ›
    Photo by AnsatzTonalli House, Jalisco, by Moises Sánchez 
    This stucco-clad holiday home was punctuated with strategic openings and takes cues from architecture commonly found in Mexican villages, according to its designer Moises Sánchez.
    Sánchez created an understated interior palette referencing the nearby architecture surrounding Lake Chapa, where the home is located. For example, the blocky terrazzo staircase doubles as a stepped plinth for sandy-coloured ornaments.
    Find out more about Tonalli House ›
    Photo by César BéjarCasa Areca, Tulum, by CO-LAB Design Office
    Local studio CO-LAB Design Office created Casa Areca to merge with its lush Tulum setting.
    The open-plan ground floor includes pivot doors and retractable glass walls, which enable the social area to flow into the jungle-like garden. Creamy walls and polished concrete floors were paired with local tzalam wood, jute accents and ceramic vases filled with hand-selected wild grasses.
    Find out more about Casa Areca ›
    Photo by Dove DopeEl Aguacate, El Barrial, by Práctica Arquitectura
    El Aguacate – or “The Avocado” – is a holiday home in El Barrial village made almost entirely out of concrete.
    Práctica Arquitectura topped the main living area with a tall pyramidal roof featuring a boxy skylight. The studio added a built-in fireplace and alter-like dining table to the space – also made from smooth concrete.
    Find out more about El Aguacate ›
    Photo by Rafael GamoCasa Cova, Puerto Escondidio, by Anonimous
    When designing Casa Cova in Puerto Escondido, Mexican studio Anonimous took cues from pre-colonial architecture.
    Inside, the central living space is kept cool by a traditional thatched roof made of dried palm leaves, called a “palapa.” Tiny square openings were also cut into some of the walls, creating “a dynamic light pattern from dusk till dawn”.
    Find out more about Casa Cova ›
    This is the latest in our lookbooks series, which provides visual inspiration from Dezeen’s archive. For more inspiration, see previous lookbooks featuring metal furniture, breakfast nooks and living spaces with swings.

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    Eight home interiors where full-length curtains add a touch of drama

    From a glitzy Parisian apartment to a converted garage in Buffalo, New York, our latest lookbook collects eight residential interiors where floor-to-ceiling curtains inject a theatrical feel.

    Curtains aren’t just for covering windows. A set of statement drapes can be an easy way to significantly change the mood of a room, particularly in apartment renovations.
    The selection below features curtains in stage-like living rooms, rough-edged bedrooms and cosy working nooks.
    This is the latest in our lookbooks series, which provides visual inspiration from Dezeen’s archive. For more inspiration, see previous lookbooks featuring interiors with statement carpets, furry walls and colourful bedrooms.
    Photo is by Luis Díaz DíazReady-made Home, Spain, by Azab

    Duck-egg blue curtains help to create a flexible open-plan layout at this apartment in Bilbao that was overhauled by architecture studio Azab, running the length of the living-dining-kitchen area to conceal storage space and a bathroom.
    “The curtains have theatrical and playful connotations and invites the inhabitant to perform with it, to change the space and to play with the mysteries, contradictions and paradoxes that privacy offers us beyond morality,” said the studio.
    Find out more about Ready-made Home ›
    Photo by Rory GardinerRuckers Hill House, Australia, by Studio Bright
    In this extension to an Edwardian family home in Melbourne, architecture practice Studio Bright raised the sitting room on a curved plinth, giving it a stage-like quality.
    Enhancing the effect is a heavy green curtain hung from the ceiling, which can be drawn across to turn the space into an impromptu theatre for the children to play in.
    Find out more about Ruckers Hill House ›
    Photo by Félix Dol MaillotAvenue Montaigne apartment, France, by Uchronia
    Sheer, rainbow-effect curtains cover the balconies of this opulent Haussman-era Parisian apartment, renovated by local studio Uchronia.
    Even the walls echo the curtains’ gradations of colour, while the brightly toned furnishings are designed to resemble pieces of jewellery.
    Find out more about this apartment ›
    Photo by Michael SinclairGas-holder apartment, UK, by Roksanda Ilincic
    Fashion designer Roksanda Ilincic brought her proclivity for bold colours and shapes to this London penthouse inside a former Victorian gas holder.
    Pale pink Kvadrat curtains over the full-height windows cast a rose-tinted hue over the rooms, where the colour palette is kept mostly neutral apart from some pops of bright yellow.
    Find out more about this apartment ›
    Photo by Florian HolzherrBig Space, Little Space, USA, by Davidson Rafailidis
    Peeling paintwork, uneven concrete floors and distressed wooden beams lend a distinctly rough-and-ready feel to this home-slash-workspace in Buffalo created out of a garage conversion by design studio Davidson Rafailidis.
    For the most part, the space is minimally furnished, apart from a set of high and wide drapes that introduce a luxurious twist.
    Find out more about Big Space, Little Space ›
    Photo by Norihito YamauchiLandscape House, Japan, by FORM/Kouichi Kimura Architects
    Upon entering Landscape House in central Japan, designed by Japanese studio FORM/Kouichi Kimura Architects, one is greeted by a lengthy corridor lined entirely on one side by a full-length silver curtain.
    The fabric echoes a raw concrete feature wall on the opposite side of the corridor, as well as referencing the extensive use of metal throughout the building.
    Find out more about Landscape House ›
    Photo by ONI StudioPops, Poland, by Furora Studio
    Furora Studio wanted the design of this holiday apartment in Kraków to be slightly more outrageous than the standard residential interior.
    A velvety, salmon-pink curtain dresses an entire wall in the open-plan kitchen and living room, adding to a plethora of sugary colours and rounded edges.
    Find out more about Pops ›
    Photo by Maxime BrouillettMaison-Boutique Coloniale, Canada, by Michael Godmer and Mathieu Turgeon
    Most of the spaces inside Maison-Boutique Coloniale in Montreal – renovated by designers Michael Godmer and Mathieu Turgeon as their own residence and studio – are pared-back and neutral.
    But in an office space on the basement level, plush orange curtains line the walls, combined with dim pendant lighting and a black table arrangement by Muuto and &tradition for an intimate effect.
    Find out more about Maison-Boutique Coloniale ›
    This is the latest in our lookbooks series, which provides visual inspiration from Dezeen’s archive. For more inspiration, see previous lookbooks featuring interiors with statement carpets, furry walls and colourful bedrooms.

    Read more: More