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    Ten home interiors framed by impressive shutters and louvres

    From windows framed by slatted aluminium fins to colourful metal panels that wrap around a building’s facade, our latest lookbook showcases 10 homes with shutters and louvres.

    Made from slats, fins and blades, shutters can be used to control the amount of sunlight that enters a home, provide privacy, open the house up to scenic views and protect against extreme weather conditions such as wind or humidity.
    They can be adjusted electronically or via hand with pulleys and levers to change the amount of light and regulate the airflow that comes into a room.
    In a similar fashion, architects and designers typically add horizontal or vertical louvres to the outside of a building to shade it from the sun or decorate its facades.
    This is the latest in our lookbooks series, which provides visual inspiration from Dezeen’s archive. For more inspiration see previous lookbooks on bedrooms with balconies, decorative ceramics and bathrooms with statement tiles.

    Photo courtesy Nishizawa ArchitectsHouse in Chau Doc, Vietnam, by Nishizawa Architects
    This multi-generational home in the Vietnamese city of Chau Doc is shared by three separate families. Renovated by Ho Chi Min-based studio Nishizawa Architects, the airy structure features moveable corrugated metal panels instead of walls.
    Occupants benefit from unspoiled views of the surrounding rice fields as well as plenty of sunlight, greenery and natural ventilation that filters throughout the three floors.
    Find out more about House in Chau Doc ›
    Photo by Cristiano BauceCasa Ventura, Brazil, by Arquitetura Nacional
    Casa Ventura, a house situated in a gated residential community in Xangri Lá, has reinforced white concrete shutters punctured by cylindrical openings across its facade.
    Brazilian studio Arquitetura Nacional added the panels to shade the upper level of the house, which contains four minimalist bedrooms, a massage room and a sparsely decorated room in neutral shades for watching television.
    Find out more about Casa Ventura ›
    Photo by Gonzalo ViramonteObra Luyaba, Argentina, by Barrionuevo Villanueva Arquitectos
    Córdoba-based studio Barrionuevo Villanueva Arquitectos paired creamy floor tiles with warm wooden furniture, shelves and battens in the living space of this property in a remote spot in Traslasierra Valley.
    A terrace with operable full-height wooden shutters wraps around the project and gives the homeowners unparalleled views of the mountainous surroundings.
    Find out more about Obra Luyaba ›
    Photo courtesy of Bates Masi ArchitectsAmagansett Dunes House, US, by Bates Masi Architects
    Kaleidoscopic patterns of dappled light decorate the interior of Amagansett Dunes House, a four-bedroom home that backs onto a wooded nature preserve in Amagansett, New York.
    The sunlight filters in through the louvres on the building’s western facade. As well as creating intricate patterns, the louvres are designed to allow breezes to pass through which keeps the occupants cool.
    Find out more about Amagansett Dunes House ›
    Photo courtesy of Jinnawat BorihankijananForest House, Thailand, by Shma Company
    Containing 120 trees and 20 different plant species, the aptly named Forest House is situated in a dense, urban spot in the Thai capital of Bangkok.
    Narrow balconies nestled between white steel louvres fringe the house and are populated with a variety of potted plants, trees and evergreens.
    “The house is designed to maximise natural ventilation and sunlight,” Shma Company’s director Prapan Napawongdee told Dezeen. “The interplay between solids and voids, which is present throughout the three storeys, brings the greenery close to every room in the house.”
    Find out more about Forest House ›
    Photo by Amit GeronLE House, Israel, by Bar Orian Architects
    Built for a couple and their three children by Israeli architecture studio Bar Orian Architects, LE House was designed to pay homage to Brutalist architecture.
    On the ground floor, polished concrete flooring is set off against an exposed concrete wall that separates the kitchen, living and dining room from the library and master bedroom.
    The occupants can rotate or slide open the dark red louvres – which are made from strips of aluminium and Corten steel – electronically to adjust the amount of sunlight depending on the time of day.
    Find out more about LE House ›
    Photo courtesy of Smart Design StudioBrougham Place, Australia, by Smart Design Studio
    Travertine stone floors, timber stairs and concrete walls and ceilings create a neutral backdrop throughout Brougham Place, a three-storey home by Sydney architecture studio Smart Design Studio.
    Splashes of colour and strips of daylight punctuate the otherwise muted interior through the multicoloured vertical wooden louvres on the front facade.
    Find out more about Brougham Place ›
    Photo by Federico CairoliWoven House, Colombia, by Santiago Pradilla and Zuloark
    Woven screens made from a natural fibre called Yaré divide this long, cabin-like home designed for the owners of a coffee plantation in Colombia.
    Shutters made from the same material frame the double-height living area, dining and kitchen spaces, allowing the house to be opened up to the outside.
    Woven furniture that matches the shutters and screens is dotted throughout the two-storey home while a fabric hammock hangs from its timber beams.
    Find out more about Woven House ›
    Photo by Amit GeronSea of Galilee House, Israel, by Golany Architects
    Israeli studio Golany Architects wanted to maximise views over the Sea of Galilee in this newly built family home set on the slopes of the Jordan Rift Valley.
    Floor-to-ceiling glass glazing on both the ground and upper level offers panoramic views over the garden, nearby village and the freshwater lake.
    To help keep residents cool during the hot summer months, the studio added rolling linear shutters which filter the sun and double as a privacy screen.
    Find out more about Sea of Galilee House ›
    Photo by Harshan ThomsonKsaraah, Bangalore, by Taliesyn
    Furniture and fittings inside Ksaraah were made from materials and crafts local to Bangalore, with tables made from local stone, bedding made from “khadi” cloth and “kansa” metal crockery.
    Architecture and design studio Taliesyn wanted the 487-square-metre house to create a connection with nature.
    Living spaces are either fully open to the outside or able to be opened up via sliding and folding shutters so that residents can enjoy the tropical surroundings. Some rooms are also elevated to take full advantage of the views.
    Find out more about Ksaraah ›
    This is the latest in our series of lookbooks providing curated visual inspiration from Dezeen’s image archive. For more inspiration see previous lookbooks showcasing residential bathrooms, dining areas anchored by sculptural pendant lights and homes with French doors.

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    Ten multi-generational homes that organise space in interesting ways

    A Mumbai apartment with its own temple and a Tokyo home for three generations and eight cats feature in this lookbook highlighting ten intergenerational households that showcase how interiors can balance privacy and community.

    Multi-generational living, in which several generations of a family cohabit under one roof, is already common practice in many parts of Asia, the Middle East, southern Europe and Africa.
    But with the growing price of housing, as well as elder and childcare, these kinds of communal living arrangements are now becoming increasingly popular around the world.
    This has prompted architects and designers to devise clever ways to divide up interiors, balancing the need for both private and communal spaces by using everything from staircases to moving partitions and planted terraces.
    Many also integrate accessible design features for their elderly inhabitants, such as wheelchair ramps and elevators.

    This is the latest in our lookbooks series, which provides visual inspiration from Dezeen’s archive. For more inspiration see previous lookbooks showcasing decorative ceramics, bathrooms with statement tiles and dining areas anchored by sculptural pendant lights.
    Photo is by Peter Bennetts StudioCharles House, Australia, by Austin Maynard Architects
    Pocket sliding partitions connect the rooms in this home so that its interiors can grow with the owner’s children and ultimately also accommodate their grandparents.
    Complete with a wheelchair-accessible garden, the building is one of a growing number of multi-generational houses being designed in answer to Melbourne’s housing crisis.
    “A diverse family home is often a healthy family home,” said Australian studio Austin Maynard Architects. “However, multigenerational homes also reflect the nature of our economy.”
    Find out more about Charles House ›
    Photo is by Ossip van DuivenbodeThree-Generation House, Netherlands, by BETA
    The Three-Generation House in Amsterdam was designed to resemble a “mini apartment building”, housing a young family on the lower floors and the grandparents on the top floor, which can be accessed via a private lift.
    A bright yellow staircase runs through the centre of the plan, helping to divide the open-plan interior while effectively connecting all the different levels of the home into a cohesive whole.
    Find out more about Three-Generation House ›
    Photo is by Katherine LuVikki’s Place, Australia, by Curious Practice
    Instead of doors, slim wooden blinds and raised plywood platforms help to demarcate the bedrooms in this Australian home, designed to accommodate the owner as well as her grown-up son and his family, who often come to stay for extended periods of time.
    “The play with the levels enables the architecture to act as furniture, which accommodates more or fewer guests for different occasions,” architect Warren Haasnoot of local studio Curious Practice told Dezeen.
    “Manoeuvring between spaces and levels invokes a sense that one is navigating between levels of terrain rather than moving room to room or outside to inside.”
    Find out more about Vikki’s Place ›
    Photo is by Albert Lim K SCornwall Gardens, Singapore, by Chang Architects
    Planted terraces are organised around a central pool in this family home in Singapore, providing each of the six bedrooms with natural vistas and a sense of privacy despite the busy floorplan.
    Local studio Chang Architects conceived the project as a “tropical paradise,” complete with a Koi carp pond and a waterfall to encourage the owner’s children to raise their families here once they’ve grown up.
    Find out more about Cornwall Gardens ›
    Photo is by Michael MoranChoy House, USA, by O’Neill Rose Architects
    Two brothers, their families and their mother share this residence in Flushing, Queens, which New York studio O’Neill Rose Architects describes as “three homes under one roof”.
    Designed to fuse American and Chinese ways of living in a nod to the client’s mixed heritage, the house effectively provides two separate homes for the two siblings, connected by a communal lower level that is also home to their mother and can be accessed via stairs hidden behind semi-transparent screens.
    Find out more about Choy House ›
    Photo is courtesy of NendoStairway House, Japan, by Nendo
    Three generations of the same family share this three-storey home in Tokyo’s Shinjuku district, with the more accessible ground floor given over to the grandparents and their eight pet cats.
    Japanese studio Nendo bisected the floorplan with a huge fake staircase, which provides a visual connection between the different levels while accommodating a bathroom, a playroom for the cats and a plethora of potted plants.
    Find out more about Stairway House ›
    Photo is by Javier Callejas SevillaResidence 1065, India, by Charged Voids
    Indian studio Charged Voids designed this house in Chandigarh to combine the communal focus of “Eastern spatial planning” with the “Western aesthetics” of Le Corbusier.
    Housing a family of six – including a couple, their parents and their children – the residence features private areas on the second floor and communal areas on the ground floor, which can be conjoined or separated using collapsible partitions.
    Find out more about Residence 1065 ›
    Photo is by Yao LiSong House, China, by AZL Architects
    A wheelchair ramp wraps its way around this house in the rural village of Nansong, which is inhabited by a couple in their 50s alongside three older family members, as well as occasionally their children and grandchildren.
    Like a traditional Chinese farmhouse, the building is organised around a central courtyard, with glazed openings providing views across the plan to create a sense of community and connection.
    Find out more about Song House ›
    Photo is by Matt GibsonWellington Street Mixed Use, Australia, by Matt Gibson
    Set on a narrow infill site in Melbourne, this home is constructed from irregularly stacked boxes that can be segmented to cater to different generations of the same family.
    A central atrium connects the different levels to the kitchen on the ground floor, while also functioning as a lightwell and a cooling stack for ventilation.
    Find out more about Wellington Street Mixed Use ›
    Photo is by Ishita SitwalaMumbai apartment, India, by The Act of Quad
    Indian practice The Act of Quad designed the “minimal but playful” interior of this three-generational apartment in Mumbai to consolidate the pared-back aesthetic of the owner, who is an engineer, with the more irreverent style of his cartoonist father.
    Intricate woodwork pieces were brought over from the family’s former home and refurbished to create a sense of tradition and continuity, while a small temple was tucked away behind folding doors with amber glass portholes.
    Find out more about Mumbai apartment ›
    This is the latest in our series of lookbooks providing curated visual inspiration from Dezeen’s image archive. For more inspiration see previous lookbooks showcasing decorative ceramics, bathrooms with statement tiles and dining areas anchored by sculptural pendant lights.

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    Ten homes that make a feature of their corridors

    Our latest lookbook showcases 10 homes that prove that with the right use of elements such as colour, unusual flooring or feature walls, internal corridors can be much more than a necessary evil.

    Corridors are sometimes frowned upon, with contemporary architects often preferring to create open-plan layouts that avoid any potentially cramped passageways.
    But in some cases, corridors are unavoidable, and they can even become a space to enjoy in their own right.
    Below are 10 examples of the various ways in which architects and designers have sought to celebrate corridors in residential interiors.
    This is the latest in our lookbooks series, which provides visual inspiration from Dezeen’s archive. For more inspiration see previous lookbooks featuring compact bedrooms, interiors that use room dividers and homes with built-in furniture.

    Photo is by Ståle EriksenUpper Wimpole Street apartment, UK, by Jonathan Tuckey Design
    This elliptical corridor leads from the living room of this flat in a Regency-era London townhouse into an antechamber next to the master bedroom.
    Architecture studio Jonathan Tuckey Design used pastel pink for the walls and striking black and white triangular floor tiles that contrast with the palette of the adjacent room, defining it as its own space while conveying a sense of intrigue about what lies beyond.
    Find out more about this Upper Wimpole Street apartment ›
    Photo is by Jeremie WarshafskyCandy Loft, Canada, by StudioAC
    Toronto firm StudioAC gave this loft conversion apartment in a former factory a more intimate feel by creating white, arched corridors with pale Douglas fir floors from Dinesen skirted by warm inlaid LED lights.
    “The upward glow of the lighting highlights the curve overhead as you move through the extruded thresholds,” the studio said.
    Find out more about Candy Loft ›
    Photo is by Stijn BollaertWeekend House, Belgium, by Bovenbouw Architectuur
    Antwerp studio Bovenbouw Architectuur designed this bungalow to make visitors feel like they are walking up a path by opening the front door onto a curving hallway of wooden steps leading up through the house.
    “We liked the idea to see the house as a walk up the slope, a path,” practice founder Dirk Somers said. “When you walk up the ‘path’, the corridor, you look into the trees in the back of the garden.”
    Find out more about Weekend House ›
    Photo is by Nick GlimenakisRiverside Apartment, USA, by Format Architecture Office
    A translucent glass portion is set into the pale hardwood wall of this corridor in a compact New York apartment renovated by Format Architecture Office.
    The glass allows light to pass through to avoid making the space feel cramped, while the millwork contains cupboards for storage, with the corridor itself serving to create a clear distinction between different areas in the home.
    Find out more about Riverside Apartment ›
    Photo is by Pol ViladomsMontcada house, Spain, by Hiha Studio
    Slicing through this long, narrow dwelling near Barcelona renovated by Hiha Studio is a corridor defined by an inward-curving wall bearing full-height doors, designed to break up the linear layout of the space.
    To accentuate the curve, the rooms behind the doors have a slightly lower ceiling that continues beyond the corridor and cuts diagonally across the adjacent living area, carrying with it the same light-grey colour.
    Find out more about this Montcada house ›
    Photo is by Maxime BrouilletMB House, Canada, by Jean Verville Architectes
    Jean Verville Architectes filled this house in Montreal with recesses and passageways to delineate the space in a sculptural manner.
    Like nearly all the surfaces in the home, the corridor running from the front door is made of plywood, producing a minimalist, functional aesthetic while also concealing storage spaces.
    Find out more about MB House ›
    Photo is by Brian FerryBed-Stuy Townhouse, USA, by Civilian
    Brooklyn studio Civilian actually created a new corridor in this renovated historic townhouse by adding a full-height maple millwork block to divide two spaces while also providing storage.
    The small corridor section itself, which connects the kitchen to the living room, is lined with aluminium laminate and framed by parquet-styled American oak flooring.
    Find out more about Bed-Stuy Townhouse ›
    Photo is by Yannis DrakoulidisTrikoupi Apartment, Greece, by Point Supreme Architects
    The flooring plays a crucial role in creating a different kind of corridor in this Athens apartment reworked by local studio Point Supreme Architects.
    A long strip of oak parquet running perpendicular to the entrance hall creates a notional walkway from the dining area out to the balcony, acting as the clear central spine of the interior despite its open-plan layout.
    Find out more about Trikoupi Apartment ›
    Photo is by Luis Diaz DiazInner Home, Spain, by Azab
    Architecture studio Azab had only a very tight budget to refresh the interiors of this 1970s flat in Bilbao and was unable to make any major structural changes.
    Instead, it chose to liven up a long corridor through the centre with bold bubblegum-pink paint and a matching carpet, with a gabled glazed doorframe fitting into the pitched ceiling at one end.
    Find out more about Inner Home ›
    Photo is by Gonzalo ViramonteCasa Genaro, Argentina, by S_estudio
    This residence in Córdoba was designed by Argentine firm S_estudio for a family with a son who uses a wheelchair, so contains numerous elements of accessible design.
    Among them is a wide, central entrance hallway that extends to provide direct access to every room in the house, illuminated by generous skylights.
    Find out more about Casa Genaro ›
    This is the latest in our series of lookbooks providing curated visual inspiration from Dezeen’s image archive. For more inspiration see previous lookbooks featuring compact bedrooms, interiors that use room dividers and homes with built-in furniture.

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    Ten homes filled with pottery and decorative ceramics

    A mid-century home renovation in Canada and an oversized thatched-roof home in Ukraine feature in our latest lookbook highlighting 10 homes with interiors that make use of pottery and decorative ceramics.

    Ceramics were a focus at this year’s Milan design week, where French designers Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec created an installation that featured pastel-hued ceramic sculptures.
    Luxury brand Off-White also unveiled a collection of ceramic homewares for the design week that was informed by architecture and the natural world.
    In this lookbook, we have highlighted a number of projects from the Dezeen archive that centre on decorative ceramics and pottery – including floor-to-ceiling shelving adorned with pots and vessels as well as open-faced cabinetry filled with ceramic kitchen and tableware.
    This is the latest in our lookbooks series, which provides visual inspiration from Dezeen’s archive. For more inspiration see previous lookbooks residential bathrooms, bedroom balconies and French doors.

    Photo is by Maja WirkusK916 and K907, Poland, by Thisispaper Studio
    Thisispaper Studio designed this holiday apartment in Warsaw with an interior scheme that boasts a minimal, stark look.
    Furnishings and cabinetry were organised sparingly throughout the home. A narrow, rectangular shelving unit was lightly populated with a collection of vessels, ceramics and objects, which juxtaposes against the home’s restrained interior.
    Find out more about K916 and K907 ›
    Photo is by Miran KambičHouse for a Ceramic Designer, Slovenia, by Arhitektura d.o.o
    House for a Ceramic Designer is a low lying concrete home that was designed by Slovenian practice Arhitektura d.o.o. It features a number of living spaces that are connected to the owner’s ceramic studio.
    Arhitektura d.o.o lined one of the rooms with steel shelving units, which have been used to display ceramic works, much like the walls of a gallery. A wooden desk was oriented toward floor-to-ceiling windows that stretch across the entirety of the garden-facing wall.
    Find out more about House for a Ceramic Designer ›

    Canadian Mountain House, Canada, by Scott & Scott
    Canadian studio Scott & Scott brightened up the interior of this mid-century home near Vancouver by incorporating a minimalist interior scheme that features wooden surfaces, white-washed walls and exposed cabinetry.
    A collection of ceramics, tableware and vessels sits within and on top of exposed cabinetry, work surfaces and shelving, adding a rustic look to the home.
    Find out more about Canadian Mountain House ›
    Photo is by Ewout HuibersHome of the Arts, The Netherlands, by i29
    Located in a former industrial area in the north of Amsterdam, i29 designed this apartment to include double-height shelving units, bespoke glass vitrines and plenty of storage space to display and accommodate the owner’s book and art collections.
    Ceramic ornaments and sculptures were placed within the highest point of the open shelving, which stretches from ground level to the Amsterdam home’s mezzanine first floor.
    Find out more about Home of the Arts ›
    Photo is by Serhii KadulinShkrub, Ukraine, by Sergey Makhno
    A large thatched-roof tops this home in Ukraine that was designed by architect and designer Sergey Makhno for his own family. Makhno looked to Japan when creating Shkrub, incorporating Japanese design and architectural elements throughout.
    In the living room, floor-to-ceiling shelving built from salvaged wood has been lined with Makhno’s own ceramic collection, mimicking the form of a nearby sculptural fireplace.
    Find out more about Shkrub ›
    Photo is by Graham SandelskiThe Box, US, by Bamesberger Architecture
    Titled The Box, this home is located in the town of Valparaiso in Indiana. The home was designed with a focus on the views overlooking its surrounding wetland.
    Its wood-lined interiors were created to reference the building’s untouched, natural surroundings. Doors were removed from wooden cabinetry and shelves in order to display collections of baskets, pottery and books.
    Find out more about The Box ›
    Photo is by Tim CrockeGallery House, UK, by Neil Dusheiko
    Architect Neil Dusheiko renovated and extended this north London home, built for his own family, adding a large kitchen and an extra bedroom.
    The kitchen was extended across the home’s former side alley and fitted with rows of skylights that adjoin oak-lined storage walls used to display an assortment of the owner’s ceramics, glassware and pictures.
    Find out more about Gallery House ›
    Photo is by Mark WatanabeShed showroom, US, by Raina Lee and Mark Watanabe
    Hidden in the garden of Lee and Watanabe’s Los Angeles home, a stilted plywood shed was built to house a pottery showroom for ceramicist Lee.
    Much like the wooden-clad exterior, the interior was lined with plywood while shelving and furnishings were crafted from scavenged wood and adorned with Lee’s ceramics, which fill the walls and floors of the shed.
    Find out more about the shed showroom ›
    Photo is by Masao NishikawaSetagaya Flat, Japan, by Naruse Inokuma
    Untreated plywood and cement smeared over concrete cover the interior of this Tokyo apartment, which was renovated by Naruse Inokuma.
    The kitchen has an open-plan design and has been organised around a single row of cabinetry that houses its sink, oven and appliances. Two rows of shelving were placed above the sink and work surfaces and used to display sculptural tableware and ceramics.
    Find out more about Setagaya Flat ›

    Airbnb apartment, Hungary, by Position Collective
    Hungarian firm Position Collective renovated this studio flat in Budapest, incorporating furniture and storage systems that cater to temporary Airbnb guests.
    An oversized wooden pegboard stretches across one wall of the studio apartment, crossing the bedroom and kitchen, and holds a number of decorative objects, paintings, books and vessels.
    Find out more about the Airbnb apartment ›
    This is the latest in our series of lookbooks providing curated visual inspiration from Dezeen’s image archive. For more inspiration see previous lookbooks showcasing French doors, homes with terraces and children’s bedrooms.

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    Ten dining areas brightened by statement suspended lighting

    A brutalist apartment in Antwerp and a house in rural Virginia feature in our next lookbook, which showcases 10 dining spaces that use sculptural hanging lights as their centrepiece.

    Hanging, dropped or suspended ceiling lighting is an easy and popular way to create a focal point and ambience in any room.
    These lights are commonly found in two styles: pendants, which hang from a single cord with just one or two bulbs, and chandeliers, which are comprised of multiple lamps and branches.
    The contemporary examples listed below demonstrate how pendants and chandeliers can add flourish to a dining area and create an intimate atmosphere around a dinner table.
    This is the latest in our lookbooks series, which provides visual inspiration from Dezeen’s archive. For more inspiration see previous lookbooks showcasing homes with French doors, bedrooms with balconies and bathrooms with statement tiles.

    Photo is by Olmo PeetersRiverside Tower apartment, Belgium, by Studio Okami Architecten
    A black ceramic light plunges down through the double-height dining room of this apartment, which Studio Okami Architecten overhauled for its founder in the brutalist Riverside Tower in Antwerp.
    The light’s sculptural form, designed by Polish creative Pani Jurek, helps soften the home’s exposed concrete shell in tandem with various artworks dotted throughout.
    Find out more about Riverside Tower apartment ›
    Photo is by Joe FletcherThree Chimney House, USA, by T W Ryan Architecture
    The focal point in the dining area of the Three Chimney House in rural Virginia is an ornamental Drop System Chandelier designed by Lindsey Adelman.
    It has a mottled brass finish and spherical bulbs that pop out against the wooden furniture below and a white-brick chimney that forms a backdrop to the room.
    Find out more about Three Chimney House ›
    Photo is by Fernando Guerra and ExtrastudioRed House, Portugal, by Extrastudio
    A delicate paper-like shade characterises this pendant light, which hangs from the ceiling in a pared-back house Extrastudio created in an old Portuguese winery.
    Its minimalist design complements the airy feel of the home’s interior that is achieved with white-painted walls, large windows and a series of skylights.
    Find out more about Red House ›
    Photo is by Charlie SchuckThe Cedars, USA, by Michael Yarinsky
    The adjustable Shape Up light, designed by Ladies & Gentlemen Studio, anchors the dining area in The Cedars, a house on Long Island by Brooklyn designer Michael Yarinsky.
    Resembling a piece of art, the ornate fixture comprises three different-shaped pendants made from mouth-blown glass and metal that hang from cords threaded through pulleys.
    Find out more about The Cedars ›
    Photo is by Ståle EriksenAC Residence, UK, by DeDraft
    Three tubular brass branches capped by spherical white bulbs define the Slingshot Chandelier, which architecture studio DeDraft used as a centrepiece in the opulent AC Residence in London.
    The light, which is designed by Doozie Light Studio, is teamed with white walls, wooden chairs and a marbled Tulip Table designed by Eero Saarinen for Knoll.
    Find out more about AC Residence ›
    Photo is by Riley SnellingWalker House, Canada, by Reflect Architecture
    Pearlescent glass lamps resembling unravelling ribbons form this chandelier, which Reflect Architecture used in the open-plan kitchen and dining area of a house in Toronto.
    The light forms part of Canadian design company Bocci’s 87 series and is crafted from hot glass that is pulled, stretched and folded like taffy.
    Find out more about Walker House ›
    Photo is by Matthew MillmanRiverbend, USA, by CLB Architects
    This molecular chandelier draws the eye to the dining table of the Riverbend residence, which CLB Architects created near Wyoming’s Grand Teton National Park.
    Its metal branches are capped with circular glass shades in earthy tones that echo the wooden finishes of the furniture below and the ceiling overhead.
    Find out more about Riverbend ›
    Photo is by Adolf BereuterHaus im Obstgarten, Austria, by Firm Architekten
    Haus im Obstgarten features an open-plan kitchen and dining room with simple finishes that draw attention to an ornamental suspended pendant at its centre.
    The sculpture-like light, designed by Michael Anastassiades for Italian brand Flos, features three geometric forms that are made from black powder-coated aluminium parts which can be rearranged in various configurations.
    Find out more about Haus im Obstgarten ›
    Photo is by Doublespace PhotographyBaby Point Residence, Canada, by Batay-Csorba Architects
    This draped chandelier is found in the white-walled dining room of a Batay-Csorba Architects-designed house in Toronto.
    Named Vitis, the light is designed by US lighting brand RBW and features nylon-wrapped fabric that swoops from the ceiling and supports hand-blown frosted glass lamps.
    Find out more about Baby Point Residence ›
    Photo is by Rory GardinerCasa Mérida, Mexico, by Ludwig Godefroy
    These inky black pendant lights hang low over the dining table at Casa Mérida, matching the upholstery of the mid-century-style chairs beneath.
    Their bold yet minimalist design is a fitting accompaniment to the brutalist form of the Mexican house, which sees exposed concrete used across all of its main volumes.
    Find out more about Casa Mérida ›
    This is the latest in our lookbooks series, which provides visual inspiration from Dezeen’s archive. For more inspiration see previous lookbooks showcasing homes with French doors, bedrooms with balconies and bathrooms with statement tiles.

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    Ten homes with French doors that bring an airiness to the interior

    A home with terrazzo interiors and an apartment that was renovated to include library bookshelves across its walls feature in this lookbook highlighting 10 homes with French doors.

    French doors can be described as a pair of doors that typically open out to outdoor spaces and have glass panes that stretch the height of the doors.
    The doors are often used as exterior doors, as they can bring light into the interior as a result of their largely glass construction. But French doors can also be used in interiors, where they divide and partition spaces without compromising on light.
    The following residential projects show how French doors can be used and incorporated within home renovations, extensions and newbuilds.
    This is the latest in our lookbooks series, which provides visual inspiration from Dezeen’s archive. For more inspiration see previous lookbooks including open-plan studies, bedrooms on mezzanine levels, and green living rooms.

    Photo is by Will PryceTower House, UK, by Dominic McKenzie Architects
    Located in the London borough of Islington, Dominic McKenzie Architects looked to lofty structures in rural Italy when designing this brick extension.
    Chevron flooring draws the eye towards black, glass-panelled French doors, which were positioned beneath a rectangular skylight and open out to a sunken garden.
    Find out more about Tower House ›
    Photo is by Santiago Barrio and Shen Zhong HaiBook-lined apartment, China, by Atelier Tao+C
    A white modular sofa was oriented toward white French doors at this top-floor apartment in one of Shanghai’s earliest high-rise residential buildings.
    Atelier Tao+C renovated the apartment to centre the study as the focal point of the house. Floor-to-ceiling smoked oak bookshelves were built around the entirety of the apartment and frame white-painted French doors that lead to an L-shaped balcony.
    Find out more about the book-lined apartment ›
    Photo is by Joe Fletcher PhotographyTehama One, US, by Studio Schicketanz
    Expanses of panelled glass blanket the walls of this home in California, which was designed by US practice Studio Schicketanz. The single-storey home and guest house were positioned around a landscaped courtyard.
    Indoor and outdoor spaces become one through the use of large French doors that provide calming views out to the central courtyard. Textural materials were used throughout the interior.
    Find out more about Tehama One ›
    Photo is by Carlos NaudeCasa Mami, US, by Working Holiday Studio
    Japanese and Scandinavian design as well as the work of architect Luis Barragán informed the design of this holiday home in the Californian desert.
    French doors frame the desert surroundings from within the paired back interior, which houses a sculptural Cylinder Back Armchair by Los Angeles-based furniture studio Waka Waka.
    Find out more about Casa Mami ›
    Image caption: Photo is by Andrew MeredithWhite Rabbit House, UK, by Gundry & Ducker
    Designed by architecture studio Gundry & Ducker, White Rabbit House is a neo-Georgian home in Canonbury, Islington. The studio incorporated green hues and different-shaped windows and openings throughout.
    The kitchen features white terrazzo floors and green-painted double doors that open to its garden. A skylight runs the width of the space above the kitchen and its island-cum-breakfast bar.
    Find out more about White Rabbit House ›
    Photo is by French + TyeAmott Road, UK, by Alexander Owen Architecture
    Curving timber, geometric shapes and bright colours define this home in East Dulwich by London studio Alexander Owen Architecture.
    The kitchen has a wood-lined interior with timber stretching and curving across its ceilings, walls and cabinetry. Deep blue floors lead out to the garden via arched French doors, complementing the home’s modernist and pop-art feel.
    Find out more about Amott Road ›
    Photo is by Charles HoseaGreenwood Road, UK, by Kilburn Nightingale
    Architect Ben Kilburn transformed his own Victorian property in Hackney, London, adding a double-height library beside stretches of pale-wood-lined glazing that opens out to the garden.
    The double-height space is visually connected to both the home’s outdoor space and a living room with a mezzanine-style railing positioned on the floor above. Floor-to-ceiling glass, including French doors, stretches the entirety of the rear brick volume.
    Find out more about Greenwood Road ›
    Photo is by Filip DujardinAntwerp apartment, Belgium, by Bovenbouw
    Large French doors tower above the interior of this Antwerp apartment, located within a residential development set inside three converted 19th-century buildings.
    Bovenbouw Architectuur looked to 19th-century design ideas to inform the design of the apartment, incorporating classical features such as parquet flooring and decorative marble panelling.
    Find out more about Antwerp apartment ›
    Photo is by Marie-Caroline LucatMaison 0.82, France, by Pascual Architect
    An open-plan kitchen, lounge and dining room were positioned on the southern side of this single-storey home in France by Pascual Architect.
    Floor-to-ceiling glazing, which doubles as large French doors, surrounds the perimeter of the living spaces and provides views out and easy access to the exterior.
    Find out more about Maison 0.82 ›
    Photo is by José HeviaHouse 03, Spain, by Lucas y Hernández-Gil
    Spanish studio Lucas y Hernández-Gil overhauled an apartment in Madrid by reconfiguring its layout, installing a new kitchen and adding oak and stone surfaces throughout.
    Orignal joinery was restored throughout the 19th-century apartment. French doors open out from the open plan kitchen and living area and are framed by bi-folding shutters that can remove the light from the interior.
    Find out more about House 03 ›
    This is the latest in our series of lookbooks providing curated visual inspiration from Dezeen’s image archive. For more inspiration see previous lookbooks showcasing open-plan studies, bedrooms on mezzanine levels, and green living rooms.

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    Ten tranquil garden studios designed for work and play

    As the start of summer in the northern hemisphere promises warmer days and longer evenings, our latest lookbook features 10 garden studios that provide extra space for work or relaxation.

    For homes with large gardens, a small studio can be a practical way to create a separate hideaway for working from home – which has become commonplace in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic – or simply to retreat to for privacy.
    From a timber-clad prefabricated cabin in Spain to architects’ self-designed home offices in London and the US, we round up 10 garden studios as the summer season begins.
    This is the latest in our lookbooks series, which provides visual inspiration from Dezeen’s archive. For more inspiration see previous lookbooks including green living rooms, mezzanine-level bedrooms and winding staircases.
    Photo is by ImagenSubliminalTini, Spain, by Delavegacanolasso

    Architecture studio Delavegacanolasso created a modular, prefabricated cabin called Tini that can be inserted into a garden and used as a peaceful home office.
    Clad in poplar OSB panels, Tini’s interior provides space for minimal furniture, including geometric desks and glowing table lamps framed by floor-to-ceiling panoramic windows.
    Find out more about Tini ›
    Photo is by French+TyeGarden room, UK, by Alexander Owen Architecture
    Yellow Valchromat MDF and birch plywood line the walls of this London garden room by Alexander Owen Architecture, which is defined by internal timber cladding.
    The small building offers a place to entertain guests while it is also used as a minimal home office during the week, featuring a built-in desk designed with the same wood as its boxy cupboards and alcoves.
    Find out more about this garden room ›
    Photo is by Gillian HayeWriter’s Studio, UK, by WT Architecture
    Designed to create the “sense of being almost outdoors”, Scottish firm WT Architecture added a glass writer’s studio to the garden of a Victorian villa in Edinburgh.
    Inside, the space was curated to provide an uncluttered working environment defined by serene blue accents and a petite wood-burner that nod to the idea of a peaceful retreat.
    A minimal wooden desk cantilevers over the studio’s lower wall, which is located next to a raised plinth that creates additional seating.
    Find out more about this writer’s studio ›
    Photo is by Rafael SoldiShed-O-Vation, USA, by Best Practice Architecture
    Best Practice Architecture transformed a storage shed into a backyard studio at a house in Seattle after the pandemic prompted increased working from home.
    Called Shed-O-Vation, the project features its original wooden black siding that mirrors the black synthetic rubber used to cover the floors and a portion of the walls inside.
    There is space for both working and exercising, with both a built-in green desk and a designated area to hang bikes.
    Find out more about Shed-O-Vation ›
    Photo is by Trent BellLong Studio, USA, by 30X40 Design Workshop
    30X40 Design Workshop founder Eric Reinholdt placed a barn-style home office on the grounds of his residence on Mount Desert Island, off the coast of New England in America.
    The interiors of the Douglas fir-lined architects’ studio are designed to be flexible, with an Ergonofis sit-stand desk and space for tables that can be moved around according to the day’s work.
    A gabled roof frames the space, which includes cosy loft-like platforms that can be accessed by ladders.
    Find out more about Long Studio ›
    Photo is by Simon KennedyGreenhouse extension, UK, by McCloy + Muchemwa
    A formerly dilapidated garage in Norwich, England, was transformed into a timber-framed greenhouse extension by architecture studio McCloy + Muchemwa.
    Designed to accommodate DIY and other hobbies during national lockdowns, the “orangery” has polycarbonate cladding and houses various amenities including a workbench and storage for power tools.
    The eye-catching orange framework that lines the extension’s exterior is repeated in its interior details such as a bright orange clock and table legs.
    Find out more about this extension ›
    Photo is by Chris SnookThe Light Shed, UK, by Richard John Andrews
    London-based architect Richard John Andrews designed the Light Shed to house his own studio, with black corrugated fibreglass cladding and a gabled roof.
    Built in just 21 days, the volume’s interior opens out onto Andrews’ garden with sliding doors that reveal space for two to three people to work below a utilitarian shelving unit.
    “The studio aims to create a flexible approach to work and play, flipping its function to become an entertaining space for summer gatherings and more intimate functions,” explained the architect.
    Find out more about The Light Shed ›
    Photo is by Andreas BuchbergerThe Enchanted Shed, Austria, by Sue Architekten
    A trapdoor leads visitors to a writer’s studio and playroom in The Enchanted Shed, a black-timber converted 1930s outhouse designed for a property near Vienna.
    Arranged over two storeys, the upstairs gable is glazed to provide treetop views, which mirror the varnished grey fir ceilings and walls. Spotlights illuminate the shed’s interior throughout, creating a tranquil hideaway for working or relaxing.
    Find out more about The Enchanted Shed ›
    Photo is by Tim Van de VeldeGarden Room, Belgium, by Indra Janda
    Simply called the Garden Room, this small building was designed by architect Indra Janda for the garden of her parents’ house in northern Belgium.
    Scale-like shapes formed from translucent polycarbonate shingles clad the volume and create playful shadows that are reflected in its interior. The furniture in the space includes a deep-red butterfly chair and a wooden table.
    “The material is semi-transparent, which is nice in summer and winter, and gives a totally different feeling from day to night,” Janda said of the structure’s statement cladding.
    Find out more about Garden Room ›
    Photo is by Wai Ming NgCork Study, UK, by Surmon Weston
    Local architecture office Surmon Weston created a cork-clad shared workspace for a musician and a seamstress in the garden of their north London home.
    The cubic structure features birch plywood furniture that cantilevers off the walls and forms twin desks for the couple, which are framed by playfully colour-coded chairs.
    A skylight throws natural light on the interior, diminishing the boundary between inside and outside space.
    Find out more about Cork Study ›
    This is the latest in our series of lookbooks providing curated visual inspiration from Dezeen’s image archive. For more inspiration see previous lookbooks showcasing basement conversions, open-plan studies and residential interiors illuminated by skylights.

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    Ten homes with spacious open-plan studies and workspaces

    An apartment in the middle of Berlin and a home overlooking the Devon countryside feature in this lookbook, which spotlights 10 studies with open-plan layouts.

    Studies are often relegated to the stuffiest corners of the house, but a more flexible layout means there’s plenty of opportunity to play around with arrangement, privacy and light, often resulting in a boost in creativity and focus.
    The below projects demonstrate why a study needn’t be restricted to a separate room or mean sacrificing style, size or comfort. Living rooms can blend into places to work and in the case of Library Home, studies can be spread across the entire home.
    This is the latest in our lookbooks series, which provides visual inspiration from Dezeen’s archive. For more inspiration see previous lookbooks including bedrooms on mezzanine levels, relaxing wet rooms and living rooms with floor to ceiling glazing.
    Photo is by Mariell Lind HansenCharlotte Road, UK, by Emil Eve Architects

    Set inside the loft of a Victorian warehouse building in Shoreditch, east London, this industrial-looking workspace forms part of a wider living area that includes the kitchen and living room.
    In a continuation of the rest of the space, local studio Emil Eve Architects kept the original building’s exposed brickwork walls, timbers and columns and set them off against contemporary finishes including new metal finishes and tiling.
    Find out more about Charlotte Road ›
    Photo is by Olmo PeetersRiverside Studio Apartment, Belgium, by Studio Okami Architecten
    Exposed concrete beams, floors covered in a peach-hued resin and double-height windows create a brutalist look for the open-plan study in this studio apartment in the Riverside Tower in Antwerp.
    The home was designed by Studio Okami Architecten to feel as open and spacious as possible to allow its original concrete structure to take centre stage. The study is only designated by half-sized walls.
    Find out more about Riverside Studio Apartment ›
    Photo is by Jim StephensonDevon Passivhaus, UK, by McLean Quinlan
    Sweeping views of a historic sloping garden are enjoyed through the window wall of this study in Devon Passivhaus – a remote Passivhaus home created by McLean Quinlan for a client with green fingers.
    The interior is finished with earthy materials including reclaimed textured terracotta tiles, rough-sawn oak flooring and charred wood cabinetry, helping to create a “serene” environment and connect the home to the garden further.
    Find out more about project name Devon Passibhaus ›
    Photo is by José HeviaHouse 03, Spain, by Lucas y Hernández-Gil
    Not unused to turning poky and compartmentalised Spanish apartments into sweeping open-plan residences, local studio Lucas y Hernández-Gil designed House 03 to maximise views of the outside.
    The architects removed the walls inside the 190-square-metre apartment to create an open-plan living, dining and study room. At one end of the room, they installed a dark wooden desk in front of built-in white shelving for a couple and their four young children to study.
    Find out more about House 03 ›
    Photo is by Robert RiegerBerlin Apartment, Germany, by Gisbert Pöppler
    As part of their overhaul of this central Berlin apartment, Gisbert Pöppler reorganised the floor plan so that the master bedroom, guest bedroom and bathroom are the only areas of the apartment that are completely separate.
    In the absence of walls, social spaces are distinguished by different materials: in the study, surfaces are overlaid with a minty colour while the entrance is panelled in red-lacquered wood.
    Find out more about Berlin Apartment ›
    Photo is by Santiago Barrio and Shen Zhong HaiLibrary Home, China, by Atelier Tao+C
    Bejing studio Atelier TAO+C transformed this 95-square-metre apartment in Shanghai into one huge study by installing floor-to-ceiling oak bookshelves around its edges.
    A secluded reading nook, which can be accessed via a set of marble stairs, is located on the mezzanine level, where residents can look down into the living area through a light bronze mesh that runs throughout the home.
    Find out more about Library Home ›
    Photo is by Oskar ProctorFlat House, UK, by Practice Architecture
    Large prefabricated panels made from hemp and lime form the structural shell of this house, giving it a tactile look while timber doors and woven rugs add further warmth to the interior.
    Practice Architecture worked alongside hemp farmers to erect the zero-carbon home which is located over the footprint of a pre-existing barn in rural Cambridgeshire.
    Find out more about Flat House ›
    Photo is by Brett Boardman Unfurled House, Australia, by Christopher Polly
    Sculptural white walls that “unfurl” vertically and horizontally into a series of connected interiors spaces were among the features that architect Christopher Polly introduced in his reconfiguration of a 20th-century house in Sydney.
    Large windows provide views of the lush vegetation outside from the study, which is linked to the living room below via a curving atrium with waist-height walls.
    Find out more about Unfurled House ›
    Photo is by Frederik VercruyssePenthouse Britselei, Belgium, by Hans Verstuyft
    Architect Hans Verstuyft spread his minimalist home office across the lower floor of this penthouse in a converted Antwerp office building.
    Like the rest of the apartment, the office is open plan and arranged around an open-air courtyard. Full-height glass windows from the desks and meeting room offer views of the 35-year-old tree at its centre and brings light into the space.
    Verstuyft finished the interiors, which are minimalist in style, with lime-washed walls and brass detailing.
    Find out more about Penthouse Britselei ›
    Photo is by Lit MaGrosvenor Residence, China, by Lim + Lu
    Lim + Lu designed Grosvenor Residence, this first-floor apartment in the Hong Kong metropolis for a nature-loving Japanese and British couple with two children.
    The studio opted for neutral colours and finishes and plenty of greenery to make it feel like a tranquil retreat.
    In the home office, which is located in the brightest corner of the apartment, oak slats line the otherwise minimalist white walls while a long, L-shaped Calacatta marble desk sits below built-in timber shelving with brass accents.
    Find out more about Grosvenor Residence ›
    This is the latest in our series of lookbooks providing curated visual inspiration from Dezeen’s image archive. For more inspiration see previous lookbooks showcasing statement skylights, kids’ bedrooms with loft and bunk-beds and welcoming terraces.

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