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    Max Radford Gallery opens London showroom to get people “in front of real objects”

    Max Radford Gallery has opened a permanent space in east London that shows collectible designs from its past shows, including pieces by Carsten in der Elst and Amelia Stevens.

    Located in Hackney Downs, the showroom displays works that the gallery first showed at Belgium’s Collectible design fair, as well as pieces from earlier exhibitions.
    The showroom is located in east LondonBy combining works from different stages of its designers’ careers, the gallery aims to showcase how the artists it works with have developed over the years.
    “It’s a privilege to be able to track a designer’s development and change in their practice across a few pieces in the same space,” founder Max Radford told Dezeen.
    It features pieces by 15 designersThe gallery, which launched in 2020 during the Covid-19 pandemic, focuses on emerging artists. By opening a physical space, it hopes to also help them reach a bigger audience.

    “The Max Radford Gallery seeks to platform emerging creatives who are working in the grayscale between art and design with a London-centric focus,” Radford said.
    “This has always been the particular area that the gallery has been engaged with and stems from a need for physical spaces to see these types of works in London, rather than just on social media – as the only option was when the gallery was beginning.”
    Collectible furniture designs are on display at the galleryAmong the artists showing in the space are In der Elst, whom the gallery had previously included in its Hard Knocks show, and Stevens, who took part in Max Radford Gallery’s exhibition at the Aram Gallery.
    The new space also showcases furniture and accessories by designers Georgia Merritt, Fred Thompson, Grace Prince, Nic Sanderson, Inga Tilda, Eddie Olin, EJR Barnes, Ty Locke, LS Gomma, Natalia Tifantilyi, Andrew Pierce Scott, Louie Isaaman-Jones and Matthew Verdon.

    Aram and Max Radford Gallery showcase emerging designers in Now 4 Then exhibition

    Max Radford Gallery is now located in a minimalist studio, which its founder intends to keep as a paired-back space.
    “The showroom is a beautiful white-painted studio space with just over half of the floor plan having triple height up to skylights, producing beautiful changing light across the day,” Radford said.
    “We haven’t made any architectural changes to the space and are not sure that we will, potentially with the exception of some sort of temporary mezzanine in the triple height space for an exhibition-specific installation,” he added.
    Max Radford Gallery focuses on emerging designersBy opening a permanent gallery, Radford wants to support London’s community of emerging designers.
    “It’s for the community aspect that is introduced by the communal use of creative space; there is a burgeoning community of designers and artists in London with lots of crossovers through universities and workshops that support and raise up its members,” he said.
    “Facilitating a space for communities like this to express and interact seems like a key aspect to supporting what is going on here in London currently,” he added.
    The showroom features pieces from previous exhibitionsHe also hopes that the physical aspect of the space will encourage people to see design pieces in person.
    “It’s as simple as getting people in front of real objects, not just heavily retouched or rendered images of them,” Radford concluded.
    The photography is by Richard Round Turner.

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    Twelve scenes froms America’s “hidden” industrial world

    Pencil production in New Jersey and the fabrication of massive turbines for wind power in North Dakota feature in this roundup of American industrial facilities photographed by Christopher Payne.

    Payne has spent the last decade exploring factories in America, ranging from “traditional industries” like wool carders to the production of contemporary technological machines that he says are often “hidden from view”.
    His reasons for creating Made in America stem from the lack of awareness of where products come from, and from American manufacturing “making a comeback” after Covid-19.
    “Most people I know have never set foot in a factory,” said Payne. “Decades of global outsourcing and a flood of cheap imports have decimated sectors of American manufacturing and hollowed out once-thriving communities.”
    “Yet, we still live in a physical world, and we surround ourselves with material things, and many of these things are still made in America. As environmental concerns and the pandemic have become urgent wake-up calls for us to rethink global supply chains, US manufacturing is making a comeback.”

    Nine municipal buildings in North America that reject bland utilitarianism

    The book includes close-up photography gathered from Payne’s personal exploration and editorial commissions and has an introduction from British author Simon Winchester.
    Payne said that he wanted to preserve the legacy of certain industries while showing the continued innovation and skill of workers – many of whom are featured in the photography.
    “All of these places share a commitment to craftsmanship and quality that can’t be outsourced,” he said.
    “There is, for sure, a certain romance in the idea of making our own goods here in the US, but it is no longer entirely nostalgia; it is also necessity and opportunity.”
    Read on for Payne’s commentary on scenes from twelve industrial facilities in the United States:
    Wool carders at the S & D Spinning MillS & D Spinning Mill, Millbury, Massachusetts
    “In 2010 I discovered an old yarn mill in Maine that reminded me of the state hospital workshops that I photographed for my book Asylum. While most such places had long been abandoned, this mill was fully operational, a scene from the past miraculously coexisting with the present.”
    “I learned of other mills around New England, remnants of a once-dominant industry that had moved south long ago, and then overseas, in search of cheap labor. I befriended mill owners, who, in addition to opening their doors, would inform me of a colorful production run, an invaluable tip that transformed a drab, monochromatic scene into something photogenic and magical.”
    A tipping machine adds metal ferrules and erasers to pencils General Pencil Company, Jersey City, New Jersey
    “General Pencil is one of two remaining pencil companies in the US, and it took five years to win the trust of the owners and gain access to the factory.”
    “I focused on essential steps in the manufacturing process to reveal a fresh look at this humble, everyday object.”
    Wafer (a thin slice of semiconductor material used to make microchips) sorterGlobal Foundries, Malta, New York
    “There is a familiarity to traditionally made objects like pianos and pencils that makes them easier to photograph than tiny microchips [featured above] or complex, one-of-a-kind spacecraft; they’re recognizable in all stages of production and we know exactly what they do.”
    “Whenever possible, I try to include people in my pictures to humanize a subject that might otherwise seem incomprehensible.”
    Vertical assembly of a CFM LEAP jet engine core
    GE Aerospace, Lafayette, Indiana
    “From the window of a plane, it is impossible to appreciate the size and complexity of a jet engine.”
    “Seen up close and uncovered, it becomes an intricate, dazzling work of art, the perfect balance of form and function.”
    Inspection of a low-pressure steam turbine rotorGE Gas Power, Schenectady, New York
    “Gaining access to modern factories is never easy. There are concerns about safety and intellectual property that didn’t exist in the 1940s and 50s, when American companies spent lavishly on annual reports and were eager to pull back the curtain for popular magazines like LIFE and Fortune.”
    “Sometimes I’ll make a beautiful picture only to find out later that I can’t use it, prompting me to look elsewhere for a replacement, like this one, which was my second – and successful attempt – at photographing a turbine rotor.”
    A technician tracing a part template for optimized glass utilization on a boule of Corning HPFS fused silica Corning Inc, Canton, New York
    “Glass is an ancient material continually being pushed to new limits, but it is not easily photographed. It’s transparent, reflective, and often quite thin and fragile.”
    “Finding this technician hovering over a massive circle of glass, lit up like an ice sculpture, was something I had never seen before, and it remains one of my favorite pictures.”
    An R1 vehicle hood in the closures area of the body shopRivian, Normal, Illinois
    “Car factories are so vast that a golf cart is needed to get around. The environment is visually overwhelming and everything beckons the camera.”
    “I never have enough time to show even a fraction of the production process so I search for quiet, simple moments that serve as stand-ins for the larger story.”
    Workers weld parts to the steel frame of an electric public transit busBuild Your Dreams (BYD) factory, Lancaster, California
    “I approach industrial subjects and busy, cluttered factories the same way I do buildings: I try to find an underlying order within the visual chaos.”
    “Here, I was able to use the bus frame as a geometric backdrop upon which the action could unfold, like a stage set.”
    Gathering yarn to be fed into a carpet tufterInterface, LaGrange, Georgia
    “New technologies are often integrated seamlessly into everyday products in ways that are indiscernible, as is the case here, where captured carbon dioxide will be fused into the backing of a commercial carpet.”
    “Even though the product is ‘high tech’, the manufacturing process still requires the deft touch of the human hand.”
    Sanding infused fiberglass inside a wind turbine blade shellLM Wind Power, Grand Forks, North Dakota
    “Clean energy is another booming sector in manufacturing. Wind turbine blades are 200 to 300 feet long (60 to 91 metres), so there’s no elegant way to show their length without including a lot of distracting context.”
    “Seen in section, though, the half circle of a blade shell becomes a pleasing composition that fills the frame.”
    Inside Stargate, the world’s largest metal 3D printer, prints a Terran 1 rocketRelativity Space, Long Beach, California
    “Essential technologies like aerospace have been reenergized by the private sector and new technologies, like 3D printing, and some factories I visited had the buzz of tech startups.”
    “Relativity Space 3D prints rocket engines, reducing the time to do so from years to months. To work around the UV light of the laser we had to wear protective gear to avoid a nasty sunburn.”
    American flags in production on a rotary screen printerAnnin Flagmakers, South Boston, Virginia
    “Even in its unfinished state the American flag is instantly recognizable, a whole greater than the sum of its parts.”
    “I like to think that a factory is similar, a whole that is only complete when everyone works together as a team. These are the people who make the stuff that fuels our economy, and in this time of social polarization and increasing automation, they offer a glimmer of hope.”

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    Twelve scenes from America’s “hidden” industrial world

    Pencil production in New Jersey and the fabrication of massive turbines for wind power in North Dakota feature in this roundup of American industrial facilities photographed by Christopher Payne.

    Payne has spent the last decade exploring factories in America, ranging from “traditional industries” like wool carders to the production of contemporary technological machines that he says are often “hidden from view”.
    His reasons for creating Made in America stem from the lack of awareness of where products come from, and from American manufacturing “making a comeback” after Covid-19.
    “Most people I know have never set foot in a factory,” said Payne. “Decades of global outsourcing and a flood of cheap imports have decimated sectors of American manufacturing and hollowed out once-thriving communities.”
    “Yet, we still live in a physical world, and we surround ourselves with material things, and many of these things are still made in America. As environmental concerns and the pandemic have become urgent wake-up calls for us to rethink global supply chains, US manufacturing is making a comeback.”

    Nine municipal buildings in North America that reject bland utilitarianism

    The book includes close-up photography gathered from Payne’s personal exploration and editorial commissions and has an introduction from British author Simon Winchester.
    Payne said that he wanted to preserve the legacy of certain industries while showing the continued innovation and skill of workers – many of whom are featured in the photography.
    “All of these places share a commitment to craftsmanship and quality that can’t be outsourced,” he said.
    “There is, for sure, a certain romance in the idea of making our own goods here in the US, but it is no longer entirely nostalgia; it is also necessity and opportunity.”
    Read on for Payne’s commentary on scenes from twelve industrial facilities in the United States:
    Wool carders at the S & D Spinning MillS & D Spinning Mill, Millbury, Massachusetts
    “In 2010 I discovered an old yarn mill in Maine that reminded me of the state hospital workshops that I photographed for my book Asylum. While most such places had long been abandoned, this mill was fully operational, a scene from the past miraculously coexisting with the present.”
    “I learned of other mills around New England, remnants of a once-dominant industry that had moved south long ago, and then overseas, in search of cheap labor. I befriended mill owners, who, in addition to opening their doors, would inform me of a colorful production run, an invaluable tip that transformed a drab, monochromatic scene into something photogenic and magical.”
    A tipping machine adds metal ferrules and erasers to pencils General Pencil Company, Jersey City, New Jersey
    “General Pencil is one of two remaining pencil companies in the US, and it took five years to win the trust of the owners and gain access to the factory.”
    “I focused on essential steps in the manufacturing process to reveal a fresh look at this humble, everyday object.”
    Wafer (a thin slice of semiconductor material used to make microchips) sorterGlobal Foundries, Malta, New York
    “There is a familiarity to traditionally made objects like pianos and pencils that makes them easier to photograph than tiny microchips [featured above] or complex, one-of-a-kind spacecraft; they’re recognizable in all stages of production and we know exactly what they do.”
    “Whenever possible, I try to include people in my pictures to humanize a subject that might otherwise seem incomprehensible.”
    Vertical assembly of a CFM LEAP jet engine core
    GE Aerospace, Lafayette, Indiana
    “From the window of a plane, it is impossible to appreciate the size and complexity of a jet engine.”
    “Seen up close and uncovered, it becomes an intricate, dazzling work of art, the perfect balance of form and function.”
    Inspection of a low-pressure steam turbine rotorGE Gas Power, Schenectady, New York
    “Gaining access to modern factories is never easy. There are concerns about safety and intellectual property that didn’t exist in the 1940s and 50s, when American companies spent lavishly on annual reports and were eager to pull back the curtain for popular magazines like LIFE and Fortune.”
    “Sometimes I’ll make a beautiful picture only to find out later that I can’t use it, prompting me to look elsewhere for a replacement, like this one, which was my second – and successful attempt – at photographing a turbine rotor.”
    A technician tracing a part template for optimized glass utilization on a boule of Corning HPFS fused silica Corning Inc, Canton, New York
    “Glass is an ancient material continually being pushed to new limits, but it is not easily photographed. It’s transparent, reflective, and often quite thin and fragile.”
    “Finding this technician hovering over a massive circle of glass, lit up like an ice sculpture, was something I had never seen before, and it remains one of my favorite pictures.”
    An R1 vehicle hood in the closures area of the body shopRivian, Normal, Illinois
    “Car factories are so vast that a golf cart is needed to get around. The environment is visually overwhelming and everything beckons the camera.”
    “I never have enough time to show even a fraction of the production process so I search for quiet, simple moments that serve as stand-ins for the larger story.”
    Workers weld parts to the steel frame of an electric public transit busBuild Your Dreams (BYD) factory, Lancaster, California
    “I approach industrial subjects and busy, cluttered factories the same way I do buildings: I try to find an underlying order within the visual chaos.”
    “Here, I was able to use the bus frame as a geometric backdrop upon which the action could unfold, like a stage set.”
    Gathering yarn to be fed into a carpet tufterInterface, LaGrange, Georgia
    “New technologies are often integrated seamlessly into everyday products in ways that are indiscernible, as is the case here, where captured carbon dioxide will be fused into the backing of a commercial carpet.”
    “Even though the product is ‘high tech’, the manufacturing process still requires the deft touch of the human hand.”
    Sanding infused fiberglass inside a wind turbine blade shellLM Wind Power, Grand Forks, North Dakota
    “Clean energy is another booming sector in manufacturing. Wind turbine blades are 200 to 300 feet long (60 to 91 metres), so there’s no elegant way to show their length without including a lot of distracting context.”
    “Seen in section, though, the half circle of a blade shell becomes a pleasing composition that fills the frame.”
    Inside Stargate, the world’s largest metal 3D printer, prints a Terran 1 rocketRelativity Space, Long Beach, California
    “Essential technologies like aerospace have been reenergized by the private sector and new technologies, like 3D printing, and some factories I visited had the buzz of tech startups.”
    “Relativity Space 3D prints rocket engines, reducing the time to do so from years to months. To work around the UV light of the laser we had to wear protective gear to avoid a nasty sunburn.”
    American flags in production on a rotary screen printerAnnin Flagmakers, South Boston, Virginia
    “Even in its unfinished state the American flag is instantly recognizable, a whole greater than the sum of its parts.”
    “I like to think that a factory is similar, a whole that is only complete when everyone works together as a team. These are the people who make the stuff that fuels our economy, and in this time of social polarization and increasing automation, they offer a glimmer of hope.”

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    “I don’t think we should put celebrity designers on a pedestal” says Bobby Berk

    Queer Eye star Bobby Berk recently quit the hit show to run his interior design studio full-time. In this exclusive interview, he discusses how his TV experiences have shaped his approach.

    Having announced in November 2023 that he would be leaving his role as the Netflix reality series’ interior design expert after eight seasons, Berk has since leaned full-time into work through his eponymous studio – as well as being a Dezeen Awards judge.
    “I think the show really did make me more confident in using colour”
    “Designing for TV is very different from designing for a ‘real world’ project,” Berk told Dezeen. “The timeline is so much quicker [in TV], and you’re also creating a space that has to work in person and translate on screen.”
    Berk described how his work on Queer Eye – which sees the five expert presenters make positive changes to an ordinary person’s lifestyle – required him to adapt his usual design style in order to satisfy the needs of the show’s makeover subjects.

    “Design-wise, my work on Queer Eye often featured much more colour and pattern than I typically use,” he explained. “I wanted to reflect the personalities and desires of the inhabitants, and that often meant going bold.”
    Berk appeared in eight seasons of Netflix’s hit reality show Queer EyeIn contrast, Berk describes his personal style as a “mix of organic, modern, classic, Spanish, and minimal with a mostly neutral colour palette” that leans towards working with natural materials and geometric shapes.
    He cites his LA-based studio, in a recently renovated 1970s Spanish-style home, as the project that most accurately reflects his own style.
    Rooms filled with a palette dominated by black, white, marble and wood detailing house the designer’s headquarters and various home products.
    Nevertheless, he reports that Queer Eye has opened him up to experimenting with bolder tones and patterns.
    “I believe we should let the work speak for itself”
    “I’ve brought in hits of colour in a handful of projects since then, and I think the show really did make me more confident in using colour – especially in wallpaper, unique paint treatments, and murals,” he said.
    Berk argues that his style isn’t definable in a single term or phrase – but acknowledges that certain aspects of his taste were cemented by moving from New York to California, after a childhood spent in the Bible Belt.
    “It really all developed over time, there wasn’t an exact moment my style all came together,” he said. “Rather, I feel all my past experiences and influences blended into a more discernible look and feel when I moved to California.”
    The interior designer says working on TV pushed him to be more confident in experimenting with colourLos Angeles continues to have the greatest influence on his work, ahead of the various locations Queer Eye filmed – including Atlanta, Philadelphia, New Orleans and a spin-off season in Japan – or Portugal, where the designer now lives part-time.
    “Of all the places I’ve lived and travelled, Los Angeles is the city that continues to drive my creativity and help me to see through fresh eyes,” he said.
    “It’s a very inspiring place on many different levels, and there is such a legacy of incredible architecture and design.”

    Five key projects by interior designer and Dezeen Awards judge Bobby Berk

    Design as a tool for improving well-being has remained at the centre of Berk’s work before, during and after Queer Eye, and he explored the theme further in his book Right at Home: How Good Design Is Good For The Mind, published last year.
    “From the very beginning of my career, I’ve known the power that design can have to change your life,” he said.
    “That will always be the throughline of my work, to use design as not just a way to make a beautiful room, but as an invaluable tool for improving wellness and mental health.”
    Berk’s LA office exemplifies his “organic” and “minimal” styleWhile he admits being in the spotlight can be both “challenging” and “flattering”, Berk is keen for his design work to be judged on its own merits.
    “Being cast on a television show has obviously changed my life in incredible ways and afforded me so many amazing opportunities,” he said. “Part of that also means being a public figure and having people be interested in more than just your design work.”
    “Sometimes it’s challenging, sometimes it’s flattering, but it’s what I signed up for,” he added. “I also don’t think we should put celebrity designers on a pedestal or value their work above other working designers who may not have had the same exposure.”
    “I believe we should let the work speak for itself, and give space to anyone that is talented and creating compelling design.”
    The photography is by Sara Ligorria Tramp.
    Dezeen In DepthIf you enjoy reading Dezeen’s interviews, opinions and features, subscribe to Dezeen In Depth. Sent on the last Friday of each month, this newsletter provides a single place to read about the design and architecture stories behind the headlines.

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    Feature in Dezeen’s digital guide for London Design Festival 2024

    London Design Festival is on the horizon. Make sure you don’t miss out on featuring in this year’s Dezeen Events Guide’s digital guide for the festival, which takes place from 14 to 22 September.

    The nine-day festival hosts a series of events across 11 districts, including exhibitions, open showrooms, talks, tours, product launches, pop-up shops and parties.
    This year marks London Design Festival’s 22nd edition, with hundreds of events expected to take place across the city attracting hundreds of thousands of attendees.
    Get listed in Dezeen’s digital guide to London Design Festival
    Get in touch with the Dezeen Events Guide team at [email protected] to book in your listing or to discuss a wider partnership with Dezeen. There are three types of listings:

    There are three types of listings:
    Standard listings cost £125 and include the event name, date and location details plus a website link. These listings will also feature up to 50 words of text about the event.
    Enhanced listings cost £175 and include all of the above plus an image at the top of the listing’s page and an image in the listing preview on the Dezeen Events Guide homepage. These listings will also feature up to 100 words of text about the event.
    Featured listings cost £350 and include all elements of an enhanced listing plus a post on Dezeen’s Threads channel, inclusion in the featured events carousel on the right hand of the homepage for up to two weeks and 150 words of text about the event. This text can include commercial information such as ticket prices and offers and can feature additional links to website pages such as ticket sales, newsletter signups etc.
    About Dezeen Events Guide
    Dezeen Events Guide is our guide to the best architecture and design events taking place across the world each year.
    The guide is updated weekly and includes virtual events, conferences, trade fairs, major exhibitions and design weeks.
    For more details on inclusion in Dezeen Events Guide, including in our guide to London Design Festival, email [email protected].
    The illustration is by Justyna Green.

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    Design Centre, Chelsea Harbour reveals Wow!house 2024 in exclusive Dezeen video

    Design Centre, Chelsea Harbour is hosting the third edition of Wow!house, a purpose-built showhome in London exhibiting works by international designers, as seen in this video produced by Dezeen for the interiors hub.

    Designers were invited to showcase their designs in separate rooms of the house over which they are given complete creative control.
    Wow!house 2024 is held at Design Centre, Chelsea Harbour and features 19 rooms by international designersThere are 19 custom rooms in total at Wow!house, including a study by Anahita Rigby and a Zimmer + Rohde bedroom by Tolu Adẹ̀kọ́.
    “It’s about accessing all of these creatives under one roof,” says Claire German, CEO of Design Centre, Chelsea Harbour in the exclusive Dezeen video interview.
    The Home Bar was created by OZA Design and draws inspiration from Western and Eastern culturesThe Home Bar was designed by OZA Design with the aim of bringing together Western and Eastern cultures.

    “We wanted the guests to come on a journey… like on the Orient Express,” said OZA Design’s Alexandre Simeray.
    The Zimmer + Rohde Bedroom Suite was designed by Adẹ̀kọ́ & Co. Studio.
    “We want it to take guests away from what would be the normal, expected bedroom and create something quite… unusual,” said the studio’s founder Tolu Adẹ̀kọ́.
    The Zimmer + Rohde Bedroom Suite was created by London-based designer Tolu Adẹ̀kọ́”Exhibiting at Wow!House means a great deal to me personally,” he went on to explain.
    “Being the first British-Nigerian designer selected to work on the space and to show the public what could be done from a small studio based in southeast London.”
    The House of Rohl Primary Bathroom features a painted landscape above a circular bath tubA large circular bath takes centre stage in the House of Rohl Primary Bathroom by Michaelis Boyd, which sits within an alcove with a painted dome on top.
    The Study was designed by Anahita Rigby and fuses Georgian and Japanese design principles.
    The Study at Wow!house features Georgian and Japanese aestheticsRigby mentioned that she was inspired by the objects people bring home from their travels abroad.
    “Falling in love with something on holiday and bringing it home and it’s your new favourite thing you put on your mantelpiece… it’s what interiors are all about,” said Rigby.
    German cites the “incredible” level of detail in each room, noting that the importance of the ceiling continued as a theme throughout the home. “The designers have used it as the fifth wall,” she explained.

    Design Centre, Chelsea Harbour to host WOW!house 2024

    Design Centre, Chelsea Harbour has stated that the materials used throughout the home will be repurposed, or returned whenever possible, while rooms such as the Martin Moore kitchen will be re-installed in a new location after the event.
    There will be a programme of events, including tours of WOW!house, open to the public until 4 July 2024.
    WOW!house runs from 4 June to 4 July 2024 at Design Centre, Chelsea Harbour in London. See Dezeen Events Guide for an up-to-date list of architecture and design events taking place around the world.
    Partnership content
    This video was produced by Dezeen for the Design Centre, Chelsea Harbour as part of a partnership. Find out more about Dezeen’s partnership content here.

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    Objective Studies drops first equitable design collection with A Calm Place exhibition

    A tranquil exhibition during 3 Days of Design showcased the launch collection for Objective Studies, a digital platform that shares its profits with designers and makers.

    A Calm Place featured furniture and homeware from 10 designers and studios, all now being marketed and sold directly from Objective Studies.
    Objective Studies launched with an exhibition at RefugioThe objects were presented in a scenography inspired by Korshagehus, a thatched, modernist summerhouse in Odsherred, Denmark, built by architect Erik Korshagen in 1960.
    The exhibition was staged at Refugio, a co-working studio in Copenhagen’s Østerbro neighbourhood.
    The inaugural collection includes furniture pieces by Mario Martinez and Ted SynnottDesigner Matteo Fogale and e-commerce expert Lijana Norkaityte co-founded Objective Studies with a vision to bring greater equity to the design industry.

    “We are building a business model where we will share equal profits with designers and makers,” they told Dezeen.
    “We joined the industry with the belief that we can put designers and makers at the forefront, and shed light on the quality and hours needed to create unique objects that will stand the test of time.”
    Exhibition curators Sébastien El Idrissi and Sara De Campos also contributed piecesObjective Studies will launch products in limited editions, with product drops rather than seasonal collections.
    “Drops will appear when we have something valuable to show, not simply for the sake of launching or to keep adding items to an infinite collection,” said the founders.

    NoDe exhibition presents 28 emerging designers from the Nordics

    “We want to discourage unnecessary production, keeping quantities limited and made-to-order to encourage conscious consumption.”
    The first drop of 20 objects includes the pine-wood Korshage bench by Spanish designer Sina Sohrab, the Unité daybed by CPRV and the characterful Salas chair by Copenhagen-based Mario Martinez.
    Juhl & Lange designed the woven baskets, while the Korshage bench is by Sina SohrabAmong the lighting works is Arète, a vertical pendant made from sailcloth designed by Asca Studio, while pieces by New Zealand-based Ted Synnott include the aluminium Terra stool.
    Accessories also feature, with woven baskets and dustpan and brush sets by Danish studio Juhl & Lange.
    Sébastien El Idrissi designed the Stack plantersThe exhibition was curated by designers Sara De Campos and Sébastien El Idrissi with the aim of promoting slow living, inspired by Danish culture and in line with the ethos behind Objective Studies.
    The curators also have works in the collection; designs by De Campos include a hand-woven wool rug and an aluminium tray, while El Idrissi’s pieces include the Claro salt and pepper grinders.
    Juhl & Lange’s works also include dustpan and brush setsFogale and Norkaityte hope the launch of Objective Studies will bring greater transparency to the process and costs involved in designing and producing furniture, and how profit is distributed.
    “We want to challenge how design and craft products are marketed, and how designers are compensated for their work,” the pair said.
    “We want people to know why certain items cost what they do,” they continued.
    The scenography took cues from modernist summerhouse Korshagehus”We are well aware that not everyone can purchase a piece of furniture for over €1,000 but we hope we can expose the value that comes with each design object, from the materials chosen to the hours that it took to make them.”
    “We live with these objects, we use them every day and if we choose well, we can pass them on to generations to come.”
    A Calm Place was on show at Refugio in Copenhagen from 12 to 14 June as part of 3 Days of Design. See Dezeen Events Guide for more architecture and design events around the world.
    The photography is by the curators.

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    Natural Material Studio crafts entire home interior from bioplastic

    As part of 3 Days of Design, Danish practice Natural Material Studio has created a futuristic fossil-free home interior where all the elements, from the curtains to the sofa, are made from the same bioplastic.

    White Utopia is Natural Material Studio’s most ambitious installation to date, adapting the studio’s Procel bioplastic to form massive functioning furniture pieces across three separate rooms – a dining room, a lounge and a bedroom with a walk-in wardrobe.
    The White Utopia installation includes a lounge (top image) and dining room (above)The exhibition envisions a future where our homes are made entirely using biomaterials like this, which can be endlessly remade into new products and backyard composted at the end of their life, rather than ending up in landfill.
    “The installation has for sure been the most challenging to date due to the complexity in scale and the three-dimensionality of the whole ‘house’,” studio founder Bonnie Hvillum told Dezeen. “You can really start to see how we can live with these new materials.”
    Every element down to the lampshades is made from Procel bioplasticNatural Material Studio initially developed Procel as a flexible biotextile, used to form everything from clothes to curtains. But recently, the studio started experimenting with adapting its recipe to create whole load-bearing furniture pieces.

    The core ingredient is a specific – although nondisclosed – natural protein, which Hvillum says can be derived from either plants or animals.
    Among the larger pieces is a monobloc biofoam sofa”It’s very much used in the medical industry, also in bookbinding,” said the designer, who sources her protein from different suppliers across Europe.
    “It’s used in many different places,” she added. “But when I called them and said ‘can you figure out a way of supplying this to me’, they were like ‘okay, we’ve never had this question before’.”
    The installation also features a bedroom with a walk-in wardrobeTo create Procel, this natural protein is mixed with a small amount of chalk for strength and a natural softener made from plant oils for flexibility.
    Combined in different rations and cast into different moulds, this mixture was used to create not just the textile room dividers found in White Utopia but an entire bio-foam sofa for the living room, stools for the dining area and a giant platform bed that visitors were encouraged to sit on.

    Natural Material Studio creates restaurant panels from leftover beer

    By taking out the softener, Natural Material Studio was also able to create more rigid pieces, including a dining table that was originally cast as a simple rectangle but deformed into a more organic shape as it dried.
    “The presented design objects are really pushing the possibilities of these materials,” Hvillum said. “Opening the door to making them structural is a completely new route for us.”
    “I think it holds so much potential, creating materials that resemble polystyrene and vacuum-formed plastics.”
    Visitors were encouraged to sit on the bioplastic bedFurnituremakers including Isomi and Natuzzi have already started experimenting with using natural latex as an alternative to traditional polyurethane upholstery foam, as the plastic is hard to recycle and contains toxic chemicals.
    Hvillum argues that Procel could offer another promising alternative, as it can be endlessly recast to form new products or simply buried outside in the garden, where it will degrade within a month.
    “We are basically investigating fluidity,” Hvillum said. “So everything is in motion and things can move on to have another life. ”
    “This is how we envision the future to be.”
    Procel biotextiles were also used to form wall coveringsProcel has already made it out into the real world with clients including Calvin Klein and Copenhagen restaurant ÅBEN.
    A collaboration with a Spanish luxury fashion house is also in the works, despite the brand being weary of using animal-derived protein.
    However, Hvillum argues that animal polymers can actually be more sustainable than their vegan counterpart because they are made from waste residues from the meat industry.
    The dining table deformed as it dried”When we work with animal-based materials, we can actually tap into a waste flow so we work with second-generation materials,” she explained. “Whereas when we work with plant materials, we work with virgin materials.”
    “Sustainability is a lot more complex than just: is it animal or is it vegan,” she added. “It’s more about: what sources can we reuse from so that we keep things in a circular loop.”
    The photography is by Peter Vinther.
    White Utopia was part of 3 Days of Design, which took place at venues across Copenhagen from 12 to 14 June. See Dezeen Events Guide for more architecture and design events around the world.

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